Victory for Service Dogs: Canine Profiling Outlawed

Kanab, UT (Vocus) August 5, 2010

The U.S. Department of Justice has historically fought against profiling. Now, through its final rule on accessibility standards in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, it has also come out against canine profiling.

The issue arose because some communities that have enacted laws that discriminate against certain breeds of dogs. Today, American Pit Bull Terriers are the targeted breed, even if they are assisting the disabled by working as service dogs. Just ask Sam Dworkis, who has multiple sclerosis. He has a wonderful pit-bull-type service dog named Poppy, who retrieves items for Sam and wears a special harness so he can help Sam remain stable while he walks. He’s a great service dog.

But some cities such as Denver and Aurora, Colo. have been sued for interfering with service dogs and this topic has been the subject of two federal lawsuits. With the new Justice Department regulation, the issue is now decided: Cities cannot discriminate against service dogs simply because of their appearance.

“The Department of Justice developed a well-reasoned and sensible approach to preserving the rights of those with disabilities,” said Ledy VanKavage, legislative analyst for Best Friends Animal Society, who is an expert on reckless owner/dangerous dog laws in the United States.

VanKavage pointed out that people often are unaware that pit bull terrier type dogs are not the only breed suffering from breed discriminatory ordinances and laws. Many cities also regulate or prohibit common service dogs like German Shepherds, which not only are common service dogs for people with disabilities, but they also serve cities in search and rescue and law enforcement.

The rule reads: “Others have restrictions that, while well-meaning, have the unintended effect of screening out the very breeds of dogs that have successfully served as service animals for decades without a history of the type of unprovoked aggression or attacks that would pose a direct threat, e.g., German Shepherds.”

“Other jurisdictions prohibit animals over a certain weight, thereby restricting breeds without invoking an express breed ban,” the rule states. For example, Fairfield, Iowa, prohibits any dog over 100 pounds.

Weighing unintended consequences to recognizing local breed restrictions, the Department of Justice further states:

“In addition, deference to breed restrictions contained in local laws would have the unacceptable consequence of restricting travel by an individual with a disability who uses a breed that is acceptable and poses no safety hazards in the individual´s home jurisdiction but is nonetheless banned by other jurisdictions.”

The rule does give local governments the authority to strictly regulate or prohibit certain dogs based on behavior, but may not regulate such dogs based solely on the way they look.

“State and local government entities have the ability to determine, on a case-by-case basis, whether a particular service animal can be excluded based on that particular animal´s actual behavior or history–not based on fears or generalizations about how an animal or breed might behave.”

The Department of Justice says the ability to exclude an animal whose “behavior or history evidences a direct threat” is sufficient to protect health and safety.

Best Friends Animal Society is dedicated to helping keep communities free from breed discriminatory legislation. For more information on how to keep your community free from this type of legislation, visit:
Best Friends Anti-Breed Discrimination Resources

Life With Dogs post end paw print

from prweb




Related posts

17 comments

  • August 5, 2010 2:41 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Brian

    That really is good news! As a cat, I had no idea that was a problem, thanks for telling us about it!

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    Reply
  • Visit site
    August 5, 2010 3:14 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Darlene Simmons

    My husband had a Golden Retriever Service Dog, we lived in Denver & Aurora CO. We had a few problems but not anything like they are with other breeds! I am so happy to see this happen especially since there are so many different disabilities that require so many different solutions!
    Thank You this great news!!!

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    Reply
  • August 5, 2010 3:14 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Pup Fan

    Great news!

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    Reply
  • Visit site
    August 5, 2010 3:16 pmPosted 3 years ago
    GSD Family

    Large dogs in general are discriminated against. It took me forever to find a company that would write Home Owner Insurance for my family when we bought our new house, you guessed it because we have GSD’s, most hotels have weight restrictions or allow only one pet. I have three GSD’s actively showing, we have to alternate who goes & who stays home.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    Reply
  • August 5, 2010 3:36 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Jenn

    Great news. Breed restrictions are basically racism in the dog world. They are nonsense.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    Reply
  • August 5, 2010 4:19 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Two Little Cavaliers

    Thank you for sharing this information. I 100% do not agree on BSL or other forms of weeding out certains breeds from an area. But I never even stopped to think what BSL means to people who rely on specific breeds as service dogs or to the law enforcement and rescue community who rely on these dogs each and everyday. Just another reason to do away with BSL all together.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    Reply
  • August 5, 2010 4:19 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Amy@GoPetFriendly

    Fantastic!! Denver, CO – are you listening??

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    Reply
    • August 5, 2010 9:48 pmPosted 3 years ago
      Life With Dogs (Author)

      Well said!

      Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

      Reply
  • August 5, 2010 5:03 pmPosted 3 years ago
    gus, louie and callie

    This is great news.. Finally the government does something right!!!!

    Big Sloppy Kisses
    Gus, Louie and Callie

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    Reply
  • August 5, 2010 5:35 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Heather and Ellie

    Wow! That’s really great news!

    Just the same as with people–don’t discriminate by race/breed.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    Reply
  • August 5, 2010 6:04 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Tessa

    Yes, this is the Best news. I am a little dog but I am still a Registered Service Dog for my Mom!

    woo woos, Tessa

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    Reply
  • August 5, 2010 6:28 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Houndstooth

    I am thrilled to see this kind of a stance taken, since common sense is obviously not so common anymore. I do hope that it doesn’t cause even more people to abuse service dog status, though!

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    Reply
  • Visit site
    August 5, 2010 9:16 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Hank

    Now I am REAL glad tuh hear this, but us Pugs suffer from profilin’, too. Ever seen a ad fer overweight dogs? They always show a PUG!

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    Reply
  • August 7, 2010 2:05 amPosted 3 years ago
    Jim@DoggyBytes

    Another great story!

    I’m curious now, how a Pit Bull service dog would be treated in Ontario, the only Canadian province with BSL in place.

    Are you sure you’re not a closet Pit Bull guy? ;)

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    Reply
  • Visit site
    May 19, 2011 10:31 pmPosted 2 years ago
    Don

    It’s not an American Pitbull Terriers fault that scum wants them because they are either tough looking and or are strong willed dogs who would do anything for their master like fighting to the end in a pit. American Pitbull Terriers are one of the smartest and most loyal and human loving dogs that walk the planet. A look at history shows this. Any dog can be a bad dog if it has a bad owner. We should stop banning an innocent breed, and start banning the people who would abuse this wonderful animal.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    Reply
  • April 17, 2014 9:51 amPosted 1 day ago
    Kemo

    - What a great article. I will pass this post on and on beausce people need to be aware that this should not happen to any dog breed. There are responsibilities that the owners need to take and the sad fact that people use and abuse these wonderful animals everyday breaks my heart. Thanks for writing such a wonderful, insightful article.June 21, 2011 12:34 pm

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    Reply

Leave your comment

Your Name: (not required)

E-Mail: (not required)

Website: (not required)

Message: (required)

Send comment