Non-Surgical Neutering: Chemical Castration for Dogs

A new non-surgical method of sterilization for male dogs promises results similar to surgical procedures, while leaving testicles (and perhaps your dog’s pride) intact.

According to Ark Sciences,the Zinc Neutering process renders dogs sterile without disrupting the endocrine function of the testes.

“What is Zinc Neutering? Zinc Gluconate (What is Zinc Gluconate? ) neutralized with L-Arginine (What is L-Arginine?) is the first compound ever to be approved by the FDA as safe for sterilization. It uses Zinc Gluconate (a trace element) and Arginine (an amino acid), both of which are essential for the body. In fact, they are health supplements that millions of us use every day.

A specific concentration of Zinc Gluconate neutralized with Arginine creates permanent sterilization with no adverse reactions needing medical treatment nearly 99% of the time (see the question on side effects below for other minor reactions). The mechanism is so targeted and precise that in an FDA study, it virtually stopped spermatogenesis in 99.6% of young dogs 3-10 months old, rendering them sterile, while maintaining the endocrine function of the testes.”

After the injection, the Zinc Gluconate solution diffuses in all directions from the center of the testis. The specific concentration of Zinc (a gentle spermicide) used in our formula destroys spermatozoa in all stages of maturation in the seminiferous tubules and in the epididymis. The seminiferous tubules, which were replete with spermatozoa, are now emptied and collapse.

Given the reduced (or nearly non-existent) recovery period and the potential for reduced cost, this looks rather promising – provided that there are no long-term side effects of consequence.

122 thoughts on “Non-Surgical Neutering: Chemical Castration for Dogs

  1. For the person who asked why someone might want endocrine function intact… for the exact same reasons that neutering is -not- always the best choice. Neutering, especially early, can affect growth and temperament in negative ways, and is not entirely positive (but still, imo, overall something really important for -most- dogs). This sounds like it could be GREAT for people who want to neuter after growth has finished but who might have intact females around… do it early without the risk and neuter after that, maybe. Could also reduce the risks from surgical neutering if it still seems safe after lots and lots of observation.

  2. No way~Chemicals are NOT safe. By belonging to some dog groups, we (the members) have seen an increasingly high rate of cancer in our furbabies as it is. We should be trying to reduce chemical usage not increase it. Also like others have already said, the traditional method has multiple advantages.

  3. Everyone seems to have forgotten that there are downsides to traditional neutering, particularly for puppy dogs less than 6 months old. Have you ever wondered why cruciate ligament surgery is one of the most frequent surgeries performed on dogs? It occurs much more frequently in neutered males, particularly those neutered before their growth plates have closed. Spayed females, especially those spayed before maturity, often have spay incontinence and have to be on meds for the rest of their lives. There are other side effects as well that no one ever talks about, and the existence of bahavior modification for the males is questionable per most recent studies.
    Do your research.

    1. Exactly the risk of bone cancer is much higher in nuetered males the teste cancer is in intact males. Almost EVERY attack on my dogs while out and about are the result of “sexually altered” canines. I have 2 boys that were rescued that did NOT hump before surgery @ 6 months, but 2 months later are humping each other NOT any of my 6 girls. Also they lay & run 4-6 hours a day & play HARD but thge bigger brother already has belly fat BECAUSE he has no testosterone to continue to build lean muscle!!

      My choice is to allow health issue related to the belly fat or put him on hormones… The health issues will be long & far reaching- but waiting until he was 12 months instead of 6 would have prevented all of that!!

  4. If this make sense economically, it would be a great alternative for animal rescue org to control pet population = less unwanted pets. That would be awesome.

  5. i have two dogs both spaniels one is the dominant one the other submissive, over the last 6 weeks the other dog has started to be aggressive towards the dominant one, would chemical casteration cure the behavour of the aggressor.

  6. My Golden Lab was sterilized using Zeuterin at 9.5 months. We are now
    needing to have him castrated at 2.5 years, due to all the annoying
    intact male behaviors. He sniffs and licks pee constantly, humps every
    dog he meets and is unable to participate in group dog play. His
    siblings were all neutered the traditional way and none of them have any
    of the annoying behaviors. I really regret not doing it the old school
    way in the first place. It would have saved us lots of money in training and
    our dog lots of frustration. I truly do not believe Zeuterin is a
    solution at this time!

  7. My Golden Lab was sterilized using Zeuterin at 9.5 months. We are now
    needing to have him castrated at 2.5 years, due to all the annoying
    intact male behaviors. He sniffs and licks pee constantly, humps every
    dog he meets and is unable to participate in group dog play. His
    siblings were all neutered the traditional way and none of them have any
    of the annoying behaviors. I really regret not doing it the old school
    way in the first place. It would have saved us lots of money in training and
    our dog lots of frustration. I truly do not believe Zeuterin is a
    solution at this time!

  8. Will AKC dogs eventually be allowed to be shown if they have been zuetered, considering they still have their testicles?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.