What is Your Dog Thinking? Brain Scans Offer Glimpse at Canine Thought Process

Many dog lovers make all kinds of inferences about how their pets feel about them, but no one has captured images of actual canine thought processes — until now.

Many dog lovers make all kinds of inferences about how their pets feel about them, but no one has captured images of actual canine thought processes — until now.

Emory University researchers have developed a new methodology to scan the brains of alert dogs and explore the minds of the oldest domesticated species. The technique uses harmless functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), the same tool that is unlocking secrets of the human brain.

30 thoughts on “What is Your Dog Thinking? Brain Scans Offer Glimpse at Canine Thought Process

  1. Very interesting. I’m considering collaborating with a professor here on a research study with dogs which goes beyond the human-animal bond and intelligence.

    1. Always wondered, how the heck did he learn to do that? how did he learn to perfectly interpret dogs body language. He’s not that old, he’s pretty young, so my guess is, he must’ve started to observe canine behaviour at a very young age. There are many good dog trainers and dog behaviourists out there, but trully, Cesar pretty much nails what other’s can’t. Just wondering.

  2. It would take a scientist to have to “prove” that a dog thinks. Wow. All you have to do is watch them and you can tell they think….

  3. I think it goes something like this, “Pet me, pet me, is that food I smell? Pet me, pet me. Nap time. Squirrel!”

    1. SAME THING HERE AT MY HOUSE – BUT INSTEAD OF SQUIRRELS, IT IS GROUND HOGS AND LIZARDS!!! ๐Ÿ™‚

  4. We know they can think…but HOW they think is another story. I’ve dogs that can think spatially and seem to think on a high cognitive plane. The inferring and what appears to be deductive reasoning fascinates me. Smart critters.

  5. Walk, walk, walk, feed me, feed me, feed me, ball, ball, ball – MRI offers glimpse of canine thought process? Please!!!

  6. Let see, “Feed me”, “Let’s Play”, “Do you really want me to do that?”, “Nap time”, did I miss any? And no, I don’t really need an MRI to know what my dog is telling me. He communicates just fine as he is.

  7. Learning as much as possible for the point of understanding how something functions, like a brain, has great value. To simply say that investigating something is a waste of time is to ignore the value of knowledge and close your own mind.

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