North Carolina Mom Fundraising to Get Service Dog for Autistic Son

“When he has a seizure, the dog will alert us. It will help with his depression to have a companion.”

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An 11-year-old high-functioning autistic boy named Alex has been having a tough go of life.  He has seizures, depression, and anxiety.  But his mom thinks a service dog will help him, and is doing everything she can to raise the money to get one.

The North Carolina boy hasn’t been officially diagnosed, but based on his behavior, Hope Cook strongly believes that her son is autistic.  Combined with his other disorders, life can be a struggle sometimes.

 

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“Our biggest challenge is Alex – you cannot change his routine,” she told WCTI 12.  “Usually after you pick him up we have to come straight home.  Alex likes to stay to himself.”

According to Lynne Choate, director of the Crystal Coast Autism Center, where Hope volunteers, a service dog could greatly help Alex.

“I have seen at the Crystal Coast Autism Center how it helps other kids that have disabilities,” Hope explained.  “These dogs just brighten up the kids.  They just light up like a Christmas tree.”

 

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But service dogs are expensive, as they require intense training.  The Cooks wish to raise $5,000 for the best dog for Alex, who is very excited about the prospect of his new friend.

“When he has a seizure, the dog will alert us,” Hope said.  “It will help with his depression to have a companion.”

Like any good mother, Hope is doing whatever she can to raise this money, including having a yard sale and a raffle for a quilt made by her great aunt.  She also has an online fundraiser.  If you would like to donate, please CLICK HERE.

 

13 thoughts on “North Carolina Mom Fundraising to Get Service Dog for Autistic Son

  1. Please check with Best Friends Animal Society; they have a program called Careers for Dogs or something like that. They match up shelter dogs with Autistic children, train the dogs to be companions and I believe it is cost free.

  2. i trained my own dog to be my seizure and diabetic alert dog – it is actually not that hard if you really do your research on how to train them…mines a boxer.

  3. How about Canine Companions for Independence. They raise and place dogs all over the US. NO CHARGE.

  4. Check out Canine Companions for Independence- there is an application process but they are a non- profit and clients do not pay for service dogs

  5. First get your child diagnosed as he sounds like he may have Aspergers. Sounds like my nephew whom was diagnosed with Aspergers recently – all symptoms are the same. Second, once diagnosed there are many groups that would help pay for a service dog.

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