Deadly Ohio Dog Virus Hits Michigan

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ย 10.3.13 - Dog Virus

Dog owners of the midwest, beware: there’s a deadly disease striking dogs, and it may be spreading to them by their owners. Flu-like symptoms may be present, and can be fatal within 12-24 hours of contracting it.

Cases of the virus similar to circovirus (typically associated with pigs) have been reported all across Ohio, and now six Michigan dogs have died from it. There is no name for the mysterious illness, because veterinarians and scientists aren’t exactly sure what it is yet.

“The laboratory confirmation is important because the virus is newly isolated, however we are not prepared at this time to confirm that canine circovirus is the cause of the dog illnesses,” said State Veterinarian Dr. Tony Forshey. “Because the symptoms being exhibited can also be linked to other known illnesses, additional analysis and information is needed to determine if this virus alone or in co-infection contributes to illness and death in dogs.”

Symptoms can include lethargy, abdominal pain, lack of appetite, and most notably, vomiting and bloody diarrhea. Dogs displaying these symptoms should be rushed to a vet, especially if someone they’ve been in close contact with is also under the weather. Dogs can be saved, but only if they are treated immediately.

“Usually within about 12 to 24 hours of it starting,” said Dr. Lindsay Ruland of the Emergency Veterinary Hospital in Ann Arbor.

It is unknown how the virus is transmitted, but it may be spreading through saliva and feces. No humans or other animals are believed to have died from the virus, but doctors are recommending that people wash their hands thoroughly with antibacterial soap and hot water before and after touching their pets and their pets’ food, bedding, toys, etc. For the time, none of these items should be shared between animals, especially if people around them have had flu-like symptoms, and contact between dogs should be limited, or avoided altogether if it is known that a dog (or its human) has been sick recently.

“Traditionally we donโ€™t pass viruses to our pets. This year, I think that there is potential that we are passing it to our pets,” Dr. Ruland said.

 

 

 

 

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0 thoughts on “Deadly Ohio Dog Virus Hits Michigan”

  1. My Doxie had the flu early last year,, had to get flu shot for her,, and will do so, every year. this flu is very contageous. dogs get it from sniffing. where another dog that had the flu has been, the sick dog could have been just passing through,.

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      • why do you have so much hate we are here to comfort people that are going thru very very hard time losing a family member please think twice before what you say what comes around goes around I am sure this virus could endup everywhere luckily the freezing temps wil kill the virus

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        • Because people are very heartless these days. They dont care about anything but whst they can get from others. Its very sad becausevan animsl has just as msny feelings as a REAL human. Have some companion. … or maybe when they are sick and in the hospital people will have and sho them the same kindness and compassion. LOVE YOUR FUR FRIENDS

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  2. We just bought a coon hound from Ohio had him 4 days and he died… Wouldn’t eat drink or move had very bloody stools… We are in Michigan and was told it was possible parvo. We bleached everything he was around and all our other dogs houses n ground. Hope it doesn’t affect them

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    • McCoy your other dogs won’t be affected by parvo if they have been vaccinated! Get them vaccinated! If it was in fact Parvo that is

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      • I think my dog might of had this along with his diabetes cause he had the bloody diarherra and not wanting to eat. I live in Louisville ky. This happen on the 28th of September

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        • I had given my Rotts 5 series of shots. N my dog at 6 months came down with Pavo. N the adults who were his momn Dad didn’t get them.

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          • If your dogs get the shots in the first three months of their lives there is a good chance that they will not provide protection. Puppies receive short term immunity from their mothers milk and the vaccination will not be effective. About 8-10 weeks after weaning the immunity wears off and the vaccinations are effective. That is why puppy shots are repeated. The vaccination is not always effective. The vet can do a titers test to see if your dogs actually have immunization. The titers test can eliminate the need for repeated vaccinations. Unneeded vaccinations are sometimes harmful to your pets.

      • That’s not entirely true. Some dogs are more susceptible to parvo, despite vaccination, and depending a number of factors, there is potential for the spread of parvo. McCoy should discuss this with his/her rDVM and ensure that he/she has done everything necessary to prevent the other dogs from getting sick. Also, parvo can live in the environment for up to 1.5 to 2 years. No puppies should be brought into the household, if that puppy was, for about 2 years to ensure that any new puppies do not get parvo. Additionally, no adult dogs with unknown vaccination status should be brought in for the same reason, for the same length of time. Hope this helps, McCoy! ๐Ÿ™‚

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        • Some breeds are more susceptible to parvo. We had a rotty that got parvo even though she had her shots. Our vet recommends susceptible breeds get an additional shot in the 1st series.

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      • i hate to tell you but a dog can still get parvo if its been vaccinated, all shots do is lower the risk nothing is 100% effective

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      • Vaccines are not 100% effective so there is still a risk of contracting a disease EVEN if you are vaccinated for it.

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      • Vaccinated dogs can still be affected by and contract parvo. A vaccine is not a 100% guarantee the animal is “safe” from a disease…just helps protect them against it more.

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        • same with people and vaccines (although you should be responsible and get you and your kids vaccinated). i had blood tests done for clinicals during school and it showed the level of antibodies, if any, for a number of diseases. even though i had been vaccinated several times and had booster shots, i was still under therapeutic level for some of those diseases. my body just didnt produce the antibodies and i was a nonresponder for those vaccines.

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    • Please don’t buy! adopt from a shelter. That sounds a lot like parvo…. dogs are not fully vaccinated against parvo until 4 months so up until that age you should be extremely cautious parvo is not something to mess with it has an 85% death rate so keep your puppy sheltered until it is fully vaccinate and even then be careful! at our rescue we think the parvo is becoming resistant to the vaccine we have had fully vaccinated adult dogs get it.

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  3. This virus can end up anywhere. We are a traveling society and as we move we bring things like this with us. Dog owners everywhere should be aware this is out there and infecting out dogs.

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  4. I live in east tn and had 3 dogs affected by the same thing a few years ago. It was parvo like symptoms but in a 6 month old pup and 2 older adults (all vaccinated). They got sick quick and it was over soon. The vets never seen it before and all the tests were negative that they usually run. I spoke to a lady at a grooming place and she said she knew exactly what I was talking about and it was new, they called it corona virus.

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    • This is NOT Corona Virus, this is different. The Groomer was confused between the Corona and Circovirus names obviously.

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      • Right now, they’re calling it circovirus. But that doesn’t mean that it won’t turn out to be a strain of or mutation of a corona virus or even parvo. It’s so early on, that making such definitive statements when investigating DVM’s don’t even completely understand it yet is a bit pre-mature. Also, the groomer may have believed it to be a corona virus (there are several strains) if it was deemed not to be parvo, as the symptoms of parvo and corona viruses are fairly similar. The circovirus is new enough for everyone to make a lot of guesses about, but the truth is, vets are working pretty hard to find out more. In practice, it comes down to treating symptoms and keeping the pet alive and working with owners to ensure good outcomes for any other family pets. Call it what you want, even. But find the best way to treat it. Probably the biggest reason we’ll find out more than we know now about it is the human-pet link.

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  5. I have cured two dogs with confirmed Parvo F with just papaya enzyme and probiotics, the chewable human kind. But it must be given as soon as vomiting and/or bloody stools appear. Before they stop eating drinking. Once they lose the desire to eat you must crush it into small doses of water and dropper it down their throats. It is miraculous how quickly they respond. Our dog was dropped in less that six hours with symptoms I began treating her immediately because it was Friday and the vet said they could not see her till Monday morning. I dropped a stool sample on Friday got the confirmation Monday but by then she was already well and no treatment was needed. The very was blown away given how high get viral count was. We lived in apartments and our neighbors dog got it too. Same treatment with papaya and probiotics because they could not afford a vet. Their dog was far worse by the time wer started but still fully recovered in 4 days. My bet is looking into it and had begun adding it into conventional parvo treatments

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    • Please see you vet if you suspect parvo or this other virus, then you and the vet can speak about “natural cures” and other realities.

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      • Clearly, the vet couldn’t see the dog until Monday. This person reacted right away opposed to waiting 3 days. It also clearly states that the stool sample was dropped off on Friday as well. Did you not read the entire post?….

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    • please email me and tell me exactly how much and how often its worth a try i just lost 3 dogs and a 4th is sick..

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  6. I wonder if this disease could be passed to a human immune comprimised Individual? If so would it be fatal to the dog and human?

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    • if the symptoms are monitored and treated early, then no, it wont necessarily be fatal. the key is early detection and treatment.

      Reply

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