Dog Kicking Cop: Reinstated with Back Pay?

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A police officer who was fired after being filmed repeatedly kicking his State Highway Patrol dog in September of 2007 is likely being reinstated – with full back pay. The North Carolina Court of Appeals agreed with prior State Personnel Commission and trial court rulings that Sgt. Charles Jones was unfairly dismissed, and ruled that he should be reinstated with back pay.

Jones was fired after the video below was turned over to the Highway Patrol. Jones claimed that he was simply ‘training’ Ricoh to obey commands. The department’s director of internal affairs agreed, but once the governor’s office saw the video, they had Jones fired.

The  12-year veteran of the patrol can be seen in the video below kicking Ricoh repeatedly after lynching him. Ricoh hangs by his leash, with only his hind legs touching the ground as Jones kicks him at least five times, each time seemingly harder than the next.

Jack O’Hale, Jones’ lawyer, said that Ricoh was simply being ‘disciplined’ in the manner in which Jones had been trained. “These Highway Patrol canines are not house pets,” O’Hale said. “They are living, breathing weapons with teeth.”


In yesterday’s ruling, the court said that the decision in Jones’ case was made “not by the Patrol’s disciplinary process but by an outside entity whose purpose was not a fair and equitable treatment of Sergeant Jones.” The State Supreme court will have to review the decision, but legal experts say there is little likelihood that it will be overturned.
 
Fortunately, Ricoh was not injured badly in the incident. He has since been retired from service.

29 thoughts on “Dog Kicking Cop: Reinstated with Back Pay?”

  1. I wish one of us had the money to drag this guy back into court ..we can sit here and call it sad all day but what can we do to make a difference ? To make an Impact? Can we get some press for this ..? Does every news station in Nc know about this? So basically he got a vacation?!!

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  2. Looks like a calling campaign is in order. I am going to call and protest the decision. That scum does not deserve his job and should be criminally charged.

    NC Court of Appeals Clerk’s Office: (919) 831-3600.

    The current address is :
    Office of the Clerk
    Court of Appeals
    One West Morgan Street
    Raleigh, NC 27601

    Mailing Address:
    P.O. Box 2779
    Raleigh, North Carolina 27602

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  3. Does NC have a Humane Society chapter? Or the SPCA? Why haven’t they stepped in? Some of that “back pay” should go for a fine and in our state some jail time for animal cruelty! Come on NC, step up!!

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  4. This is abuse, plain and simple and his lawyer is full of crap. That is not how police dogs are trained. My nephew had a police dog for yrs and he was trained WITHOUT pysical violence and he was an awesome dog. Saved his life a few times. When these dogs are trained, they are not trained with hitting or kicking..ever. This officer was just abusive. He should not be reinstated. I wouldn’t trust him to protect me. He would probably beat me for taking up his time.

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  5. This is an outrageous example of abuse of authority-whether it is an animal, a child or an adult, to be victimized by someone whom society has entrusted responsibility for maintaining the PEACE and safety of society. The only option that may provide some measure of protection against this idiot victimizing again….is the fact that this “police officer” (and I use the term loosely to classify him by title that he should not have the honor of wearing) will now have a very publicly known personnel history. If indeed he ever is allowed to meet and greet the public again in his capacity as a law enforcement officer, every single arrest he makes will be viewed with suspicion. Every arrestee will file a complaint that the “officer” abused him or her and every case will be suspect for illegal acts by the “officer”. I doubt that any law enforcement agency really wants this jack ass (oops) on the payroll. The Court decision was based on a very narrow set of facts having nothing to do with the act that resulted in termination. It was the manner of terminating the “employee” that the Court was limited to deciding. The appellate court justices who reversed this case are not unsympathetic to the facts of the case; each of those justices are likely as outraged as we the animal loving public are incensed by this case. But the appellate court was not able to base its’ decision on the facts that led to the termination of the officer. The appellate court was limited to reviewing only whether the firing was done according the the written procedures for that agency. Apparently, the rules were not followed for terminating an officer. Thus, the Court had no choice but to reverse. This officer probably will not be allowed contact with the public because of his past performance. His credibility is beyond repair and every arrestee will be filing brutality complaints that he will have to defend against. With any luck the officer will be demoted or transferred to a desk job (silent demotion). Law enforcement will not be happy to have this kind of officer working because he has proven he is not reliable and a risk to others, both in uniform and out of uniform.

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  6. Maybe he was only doing what he knew. Maybe his training as a police officer was the same. If not, perhaps he needs a training upgrade.

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  7. as a career law enforcement officer myself, i believe this “officer” should be charged with assaulting an officer. if a citizen kicks a police K9 they will be charged with assaulting an officer, whats the difference??

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