The Awww Factor: Puppies for Christmas

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Here’s our take on this collection of people (mainly children) freaking out on Christmas morning as they receive puppies for Christmas:

1. Half of you will take a trip down memory lane and love it.
2. The other half of you will decry the message and remind the rest of us that puppies don’t make for good presents. We already know that, but you’ll tell us anyway.  😉

Let the comments decide this one…

32 thoughts on “The Awww Factor: Puppies for Christmas”

  1. In theory, a puppy is not a bad gift, if everyone has given it thought and everyone is on board with the commitment However, the excitement of the holiday, the travelling, the increased ‘traffic’ in one’s home makes it a very dicey time to introduce a new pet, a baby, into the home when everything is topsy turvy. Most of us have a difficult enough time keeping up with everything needing to be done during the busy holiday season, nevermind adding a puppy who needs constant attention, into the mix.
    My second point is this …. do you know where that puppy came from? Really? Puppymills are a very real and nasty part of the puppy industry. Pet stores and internet based puppy businesses do a booming business during the Christmas season. I adopted a mill survivor several years ago and I am a firm believer in rescuing and homing animals that are already on this earth. I do not begrudge people the ‘puppy experience’ at all…. just please do your research, know what you are supporting and condoing and know WHERE your money is going. Millers, brokers and stores that sell puppies (and if they sell puppies, they ARE getting them from mills) are scum of the earth.
    And a last thought … Puppies are not just for Christmas, they are for life.

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    • I so agree with what you said. Never buy from a pet store. Better yet go to a rescue or shelter and adopt an animal, but remember they are a lifetime commitment and ARE family members, not to be locked in a yard or cage and forgotten

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  2. Although the videos are cute a puppy or even adult dog should not be given on Christmas, too much excitement and chance for them to get injured. I hope these cute puppies won’t end up abandoned because they do what puppies do and that is destroy and chew things. Having a puppy or older dog is a lifetime commitment that can be expensive. Better to give a gift certificate from a shelter or rescue so that the dog can come home in a less stressful time. I agree with one of the above people, dogs are living things not disposable items, they need to be with their people and not locked or tied up in some backyard left alone.

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  3. In addition to your wonderful blog I also read a blog called “brays of our lives” which is the adventures of Fenway Bartholomule, Esq., long-eared four-legged country gentleman. Fenway’s human family acquired a Christmas dog and the story on that blog of what they went through for their “Christmas puppy” is a fabulous template for anyone contemplating acquiring any kind of pet for a Christmas gift. The blog writer is also published “mainstream” and writes very, very well even when doing so from the “viewpoint” of FenBar, mule extraordinaire. Anyway, the method of acquisition of a new family dog is exactly how I personally would like to see anyone contemplating a major addition like this at a major holiday. As FenBar would say, cheers for ears!

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  4. I would prefer for the boxes to contain leashes, water bowls and gift certificates to puppy or dog classes. But these are already in homes, so I can only hope they are as cherished a month, a year, for life as they are on those brief clips. By far I am most concerned with the multiple children, multiple dog clip. A disaster waiting to happen. Wait until after Christmas, research your future pet as a family and go to a shelter or a reputable breeder to help you select that dog or kitten in a few weeks.

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  5. The Momster says she really did NOT need to see all this cuteness.

    Woos ~ Phantom, Thunder, and Ciara

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  6. IT’S NEVER A GOOD IDEA TO GIVE PUPPIES/KITTENS AS A SURPRISE GIFT – TO YOUNG OR OLD. A holiday or birthday or any other special occasion is too harried a time to devote to the needs of a pet. The pet seems to get lost in the festivities, maybe gets stepped on, or worse, slips out an open door. Puppies chew, poop, pee, and knock over things as they run & play. Kittens climb curtains, chew into wires, poop, pee, and also knock over things as they run & play. I once had 5 lamps broken in one week – just from the cats deciding to play. NO PET SHOULD BE IN THE HOUSEHOLD WHERE A CHILD IS UNDER THE AGE OF 6 YEARS – and sometimes older – UNLESS CONSTANTLY SUPERVISED. Children leave toys laying around and pups/kittens will chew & attempt to digest them – resulting in a trip to the vet with surgery many times following – if the pet is lucky enough to live long enough to get to the vet. Dogs bite & knock down kids, cats scratch & bite kids …… usually because the kid is aggravating or mishandling the pet …… parents get upset and out goes the pet. It costs MONEY to be a proper owner of a pet. They need their baby shots, then their annual shots, spay/neuter PLEASE!!!, GOOD food – not junk, a fenced in yard for a dog – with locks on every gate and security to insure that the dog cannot dig out, climb, or jump the fence….. an indoor home with a screened in porch accessible for a cat, a good scratching post (at least 36″ high) or ‘cat tree’ . Toys that are safe for each – not cheap ones where the eyes can be chewed off or the squeaker can be chewed or the string can be swallowed or the elastic cord can be wrapped around a paw & cut off circulation. Pets require YOUR TIME! They are not objects intended to sit home alone and guard your house or be stuck in the yard waiting until you have a few minutes to play with them. They feel, grieve, and love just like you do. Now, even if all of these points are taken and implemented, accidents will still happen. Choosing and caring for a pet is an adult decision which should be made by a responsible adult who is committed to befriending a sweet pet that will be a wonderful friend if treated with the respect it deserves.

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  7. as one of the kids that recieved a puppy for christmas,i will tell u that not all christmas puppys go bad.the yellow lab i got for christmas when i wa 9 was spoiled rottin,he was stuffed in to my stocking on christmas morning and the rest of the gifts were left untell the puppy was full and sleepy,he was then tucked in to my bathrobe and stayed there untell it was time to go potty.he lived a spoiled life,sired beautiful pups and passed at 15.

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