$620,000 Awarded to Owners of Dog Shot by Police

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A Frederick County Circuit Court jury has found in favor of the plaintiffs in the civil case filed by a Taneytown couple whose dog was shot by a sheriff’s deputy.

The Frederick News-Post reports that Deputy First Class Timothy Brooks violated the Jenkins’ rights under the Maryland constitution by entering their home without permission and shooting their Labrador retriever.

photo - Kenneth K. Lam
 
According to the Jenkins, Brooks and Deputy First Class Nathan Rector came into their home without a warrant or their permission while seeking the couple’s son in order to serve him a civil warrant. In their complaint, the couple said that their dog was not acting aggressively, and was not even facing the officer when shot.

The dog was not killed, and required emergency surgery to repair damage done by the bullet. The Jenkins turned down an initial $2,500 settlement offer to cover the dog’s veterinary bills.

In his police report, Brooks said the dog was approaching him aggressively, and that the Jenkins made no attempt to restrain the dog. The Jenkins say they were trying to bring the dog inside their home when she was shot.

The jury deliberated for four and a half hours before returning a verdict.

61 thoughts on “$620,000 Awarded to Owners of Dog Shot by Police”

  1. I am sure that veterinary evidence showed if the dog was shot while being aggresive or not. I am glad that they won the suit. The cop had no right to shoot a dog if it was already restrained by the owners. The cops really do need to held accountable when it comes to the treatment of animals. If they are suppose to “protect and serve” then they need to care about animals as well.

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  2. If it was shot in the back it’s wasn’t a threat to the officer. I wish all the other gun happy cops got in trouble like this too

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  3. I agree totally with Sherry Daniels. There needs to be a non lethal way to handle situations like this. Such as the case where a man was walking his dog and was hit by a car. His poor dog was confused, scared and didn’t know what had just happened. When a police officer approached the man trying to help, the dog was only trying to protect his owner and wouldn’t let the officer close. The officer shot the dog and killed him. There needs to be a policy in place for cases like this to where the animal doesn’t have to be hurt or killed.

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    • why can’t they use a “stun gun” like they do on humans??? It would stop any dog in it’s track, even if being aggressive without being deadly!!! Doesn’t sound like this was justified AT ALL, and so glad the couple did NOT settle for just the VET bills and pushed it to a court case if NOTHING else to prove a point! WE can NOT let those who think they can do what ever they want because they wear a badge. MORE people should make this stand, and maybe the “cops” will think twice on how they handle a situation when there is a “dog”

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      • oops didn’t mean to do anonymous post, Pam From NE Nevada here…..What is wrong with using a stun gun instead of deadly weapon???

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  4. An aggressive Retriever??? Most of the Retrievers I’ve met would have shown them the way to the boy’s room. I’m sure this will cause some additional training at least in this particular office.

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    • ive seen more aggressive labs than i have pit bulls. but lets just be happy this wasnt a pit becuz of their stereotype still attached everyone would believe the officer. which is bull. ppl need to be educated. the media needs to stop faulsly claiming every dog attack a pit bill. i bet you that the mans dog who was shot n killed by the officer trying to protect his injured owner was a pit. cant make it out to clearly in the picture but it looks slightly like a pit. they could have used a catch poll anything. tranquillizers. but no they would rather kill the dog. id sue the city. like these ppl did and won!

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      • Seriously Elexis? I have no problem with pits, but labs have been in the top spot of most popular dog in the US for over a decade and I haven’t heard ONE report of a lab mauling another animal, a baby, a family member, or anything even closely resembling that. I was bitten by a terrier mix that required over ten stitches and was bitten by a pit bull as a child. Don’t start claiming one breed is more aggressive than they are to downplay perceived aggression of another breed.

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        • Sacto B, I know first-hand that labs can be aggressive. Just because you’ve never seen it on the news, doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen. Not every dog bite or mauling get reported to the media. Every time a vet or shelter has to euthanize a dog from an attack, they don’t call the local news first. That’s why it’s not all over the news and another reason why dog bite statistics are inaccurate. At my job I’ve witnessed almost every breed of dog being held in bite quarantine, either from their family bringing them in after the bite or animal control seizing the dog, and most of them end up being euthanized. This includes labs as well as any other “family-friendly” breeds. You’d be very surprised.

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    • The only dog bites/attacks ever reported in the media are those of Pit Bulls. It makes for more sensational news. Plenty of other breeds will bite a person. Pits are amongst the sweetest and most loyal breeds. I am on my second Pittie; once you adopt one, you wouldn’t want any other breed.

      I’m very happy this family stood their ground and won. Now, other families in other cities need to do the same. Far too much of this happening.

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