Front Line Mascots: American Combat Outpost Dogs

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They are loved by the soldiers they befriend, and are targeted by enemy snipers. They scrape by on scraps while bringing joy and entertainment to our nation’s heroes. Their presence is forbidden by military commanders, yet they commonplace on the battlefield. Meet the mascot dogs of American combat outposts in Afghanistan.

This realistic report from the front lines makes clear the challenges faced by dogs of war, and sadly, you may be surprised to learn that it’s not just “the other side” that they have to fear. While soldiers value them for their companionship and loyalty, US military commanders have had to make some difficult decisions in cases where the presence of dogs could endanger nearby troops.

Those who do manage to keep their noses out of trouble face a difficult existence, surviving on treats from soldiers, and whatever scraps of food or garbage they encounter in their travels as they make their way from town to town in the company of our nation’s fighting men and women.

When we brought you From Afghanistan With Love last week, more than one commenter questioned the decision to invest funds in saving a stray war dog from afar. Today’s report should go a long way in answering those questions. For a dog, a ticket out of Afghanistan in nothing short of deliverance from hell.

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3 thoughts on “Front Line Mascots: American Combat Outpost Dogs”

  1. I donate a little each week to Puppy Rescue Mission and to Nowzad Dogs. It’s not about saving strays, it’s about saving pets who already have “families” that love them. Our warriors suffer plenty on the front lines. Having to leave behind (or destroy) loving loyal companions, just makes it worse. I don’t expect Uncle Sam to pay for it, but I myself am more than willing to help. That it takes a stray out of a hellhole and puts it in a good home, is a bonus.

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