Texas Lawmakers Propose Animal Abuser Registry

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Texas state Reps. Senfronia Thompson, D-Houston, and Beverly Woolley, R-Houston, have both said they plan to file a new bill to help protect animals by creating an online animal abuser registry. After one felony, any animal abuser 17 or older would become part of this new registry for a decade, required to report to local law enforcement each year, or every three months for repeat offenders.

Anyone with internet access would be able to enter their own address and retrieve information about known animal abusers in local communities, similar to existing sex offender registries. One hurdle in passing the bill is cost – the state spends well over a million dollars annually to maintain a sex offender registry, and with budgets tightening, proponents of the bill will have to make a strong case for funding.

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33 thoughts on “Texas Lawmakers Propose Animal Abuser Registry”

  1. ANYONE who owns an animal can be set up by a vindictive neighbor, a vindictive Ex, or an overzealous or corrupt animal control person, and be hounded for the rest of their life because of such trivia as a kibble in a water bowl, a cobweb, or a dog sleeping in his crate.
    NOBODY who is thus accused is ever totally exonerated, regardless of the evidence, or even being found innocent in a court of law.
    These laws are the brain child of Animal Rights Wackoes, who are bent on punishing anyone who dares to OWN animals.
    We don’t even do this to people convicted of Child or Elder Abuse.
    What makes these people think it’s right to do it to pet owners?

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  2. Day after day, week after week, we see evidence that “animal cruelty charges” are the tool of the overly-zealous animal control officer. The most recent example is in Memphis in the case of a woman who committed suicide when the ACO took her animals using trumped up charges. The ACO claimed a complaint, anonymous of course, of a loose animal. This then became a charge of un-neutered animals and high-ho, away the animals go. The national literature is full of cases….Dan Christsen, Norman Pang, etc, etc.

    All this bill would be is another hammer that the zealot ACO could use to pound innocent folks into the ground. When rationale thought and common sense dictate that people be helped, not criminalized, the ACO wants this tool instead. They’re the real criminals….the ACOs that have no respect for the rule of law. Put them on a list and make them pariahs!

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  3. This idea is a complete abomination. A registry of animal abusers? Really?
    What’s next? One for people who have parking tickets, traffic violations, gave to the homeless panhandler on the corner?
    The ONLY purpose a bill like this would accomplish would be to post personal info of people targetted by the less than sane. The outcome would be years and years of harassment, threats of harm and even death and maybe even murder. If you own a pet, in due time, you will find your own name on a registry as this. Are YOU willing to risk your life, the lives of your children because of misguided emotional reactions to complete BS allegations?
    If you answered yes, please provide your full name and home address as you need your children removed from you immediately to ensure their safety.
    (then we’ll Put your name on a list)

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    • RoninDallas, you must not be a pet owner. Why would you not want to know if the person living beside you or in your neighborhood had done this type of thing to another animal. He could do it again to his neighbors pet also.

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      • Doglover,
        You couldn’t be further from the truth.
        I “am owned” by 1 northern breed currently, our aged female crossed back on June. I do rescue of said northern breeds, I am active in marine fishes and coral husbandry AND work a “normal Job”.
        Since you’re psychic ability so attuned, care to come up with something else?

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  4. This is a great way to show abusers that we won’t put up with them harming animals. In most cases, the abuser starts with animals and then moves up to people. They prey on the helpless to show their power over them. If you could see how many animals come into shelters due to abuse cases, it might change your minds. In some domestic violence cases, the abuses will kill the animals in front of their families to terrorize them and show they can do the same thing to them. Some victims are afraid to leave their abusers because they are afraid their beloved pet will be killed. What was it about serial killers starting to learn how to kill by beginning with animals…

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  5. and just as many if not more serial killers never harmed an animal in their life but certainly harmed humans.. with no history of animal abuse.. Many of you have state comments like they are facts.. which they are not. The law deals with animals abusers just as they so with all types of criminals. There is not need to have a “registry” for them. In fact even the sexual offenders registry has been proved to be of any use to anyone. Please take your vigilante type of law making elsewhere..why is it people like Kimber assume that f you are against this type of bill you have never worked in a shelter. That just is not so. abusers who abuse their family members should be taken care of by the laws that we have.. ever notice .. there is no “registry” for wife beaters.. no registry for those who abuse and beat up children..
    Dog lover… I have pets.. and no I would not want to know.. i do not think my pets are at risk because I WATCH my pets.

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  6. Studies show that any “registries ” do not work.. here is just one:
    Despite the fact that the federal and many state governments have enacted registration and community notification laws as a means to better protect communities from sexual offending, limited empirical research has been conducted to examine the impact of such legislation on public safety. Therefore, utilizing time-series analyses, this study examined differences in sexual offense arrest rates before and after the enactment of New York State’s Sex Offender Registration Act. Results provide no support for the effectiveness of registration and community notification laws in reducing sexual offending by: (a) rapists, (b) child molesters, (c) sexual recidivists, or (d) first-time sex offenders. Analyses also showed that over 95% of all sexual offense arrests were committed by first-time sex offenders, casting doubt on the ability of laws that target repeat offenders to meaningfully reduce sexual offending. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved) study:

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