The Awww Factor: Puppies for Christmas

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Here’s our take on this collection of people (mainly children) freaking out on Christmas morning as they receive puppies for Christmas:

1. Half of you will take a trip down memory lane and love it.
2. The other half of you will decry the message and remind the rest of us that puppies don’t make for good presents. We already know that, but you’ll tell us anyway.  😉

Let the comments decide this one…

32 thoughts on “The Awww Factor: Puppies for Christmas”

  1. Yep, incredibly cute. But let’s see how many of those beautiful bundles of joy are still living with those families in a few months. Nothing cuter than a puppy, but not much that takes more effort, either….

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  2. There was recently an article going around on Facebook that I geratly agreed with — IF getting a dog or a cat for Christmas is a decision made based upon research on the right pet for your situation and NOT a rush decision based on a cute puppy’s face in a pet store window, AND the family has done the research on costs AND goes into it knowing it is a lifelong commitment, then I am absolutely fine with a family getting a pet for Christmas.

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  3. I think giving living creatures as gifts – for any occasion – perpetuates the mindset that pets are just things. They’ll be enjoyed for a while and then disposed of when the recipient gets bored, overworked, tired of the hassle, etc.

    Bringing home a pet should be a day of learning responsibilities and bonding with the new family member. Everyone should understand that taking responsibility for a pet is commitment for the rest of that animal’s life. It’s a happy day, but it’s not a holiday. Any experienced pet owner knows that.

    Giving the pet along with a bunch of gifts the kids will tire of by New Year’s Day puts the pet in the same class as the crass, disposable, commercial garbage that passes for gifts these days. People think of the animal as just another product. And when it “breaks” (misbehaves) or becomes inconvenient, it’s bye-bye to the cutie pie “toy.”

    My $0.02.

    Loretta James & Wesley Dog

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  4. lol not funny you made me cry lol loved it young and old hey i had my puppy on mmy 14th birthday after annoying my mom for years we both went to the dogs home and picked a rescue pup and i have to say that was the best day and birthday i ever had we had him for 13 years before he got his angle wings

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  5. I got my dearest dog, Clancy, from the dog pound. He had been thrown over the fence in the middle of the night in mid January. We speculate a Christmas present no longer wanted.

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  6. I just received my White German Shepherd puppy, Fergie for Christmas. Mind you, she was not placed into a gift box and I knew about her a week before. We picked her up on Christmas Eve and she now has a forever home that will provide her with more love than she’ll know what to do with. If the person GIVING the puppy is willing to take the responsibility of the PUPPY (if given to children) then I think a puppy for Christmas is ok. If an adult is the recipient of the puppy, I would advise that the giver be CERTAIN the adult wishes to take on the responsibility for the next 10-20 years (depending on the kind of puppy). And if the recipient decides that they do not WANT the puppy, the giver should be ready to take responsibility of the puppy for it’s life. Too bad most people dont see dogs like their kids… I do and I will love Fergie just as much as I do my other 8 dogs and did my last 6 that I lost.

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  7. Please don’t think badly of me … it was cute, however I thought that shelters etc would not allow you to adopt an animal at Christmas time. 1 Because they prefer to place animals with a family who will love them permanently (as perm as poss) and 2 to ensure that the newest member to a family is neither forgotten about or stepped on during the holiday excitement.

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