UK Law Requires Dog Parents to “Chip” Their Dogs or Be Fined

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A dog being chipped. More than one million dog owners face a £500 fine if they fail to microchip their dogs ahead of a Government deadline in just one month's time.Nearly 1.5 million of an estimated 8.5 million dogs in the UK aren't tagged with details about their owners and it's costing £57 million a year to deal with. Pet owners only have until 6 April to get the tiny chip inserted under their animal's skin or they could be forced to cough up.According to a study by pet insurers Animal Friends, 26 per cent of owners have one or more dogs who are not registered on government approved databases. One in ten of these owners say they don't need to be as their dog never leaves their side and seven percent say it's unnecessary as their pet wears a collar.Other owners were worried about data security - with 10 percent saying they feared a chip in their dog could track their movements.And up to 12 per cent of owners don't know whether their dog is microchipped at all.The Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations 2014 orders that from April 2016, all dog owners must have their animals microchipped with their details on a reunification database.The law is set to reduce the number of dogs that need to be "kenneled, rehomed or put down because their keepers cannot be traced". Previously, microchipping pets has been voluntary since the introduction of the technology 20 years ago.

 

 

There is a stat out of the United Kingdom that says about 1.5 million dogs there are without a microchip that carries identification information.  That means that 1.5 million dogs, if ever lost, will be that much more difficult to return to their families, and also costs shelters and government based animal services a ton of money and extra effort.  The new law takes effect next month, and if your dog is found without a chip, you could be fined.

The microchips for pets have been around for quite some time.  However, not every dog that gets sold or adopted is outfitted with one, and really can depend on how you got your dog.  If you got your dog from your local SPCA, or other shelter, many times the dog will be “chipped” there if he or she has been given one before they got there.  However, if you bought your dog off of a breeder, or somewhere online, it’s very unlikely the dog will be given one.

 

A dog being chipped. More than one million dog owners face a £500 fine if they fail to microchip their dogs ahead of a Government deadline in just one month's time.Nearly 1.5 million of an estimated 8.5 million dogs in the UK aren't tagged with details about their owners and it's costing £57 million a year to deal with. Pet owners only have until 6 April to get the tiny chip inserted under their animal's skin or they could be forced to cough up.According to a study by pet insurers Animal Friends, 26 per cent of owners have one or more dogs who are not registered on government approved databases. One in ten of these owners say they don't need to be as their dog never leaves their side and seven percent say it's unnecessary as their pet wears a collar.Other owners were worried about data security - with 10 percent saying they feared a chip in their dog could track their movements.And up to 12 per cent of owners don't know whether their dog is microchipped at all.The Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations 2014 orders that from April 2016, all dog owners must have their animals microchipped with their details on a reunification database.The law is set to reduce the number of dogs that need to be "kenneled, rehomed or put down because their keepers cannot be traced". Previously, microchipping pets has been voluntary since the introduction of the technology 20 years ago.

 

So, a dog brought into a shelter without a chip will definitely make finding the dog’s family a bit more difficult.  Yes, social media outlets like Facebook and Twitter has been a huge help in finding families of missing dogs and calling attention to abusive humans to help bring them to justice.  However, it isn’t 100% perfect, and doesn’t work all the time.  Also, there is a larger expense that shelters will face when a dog that lacks any identification is brought in.

In an effort to make things easier, and to increase the rate at which dogs are brought back home to the right people, the UK has a law going into effect that is going to require people to have their dogs chipped.  When you think about it, the idea has the potential to benefit everyone involved.

 

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The rules are pretty clear on what you have to do, and what your continuing responsibilities will be as well.  For instance, you will have to get your dog chipped which does come with a small charge from the provider of the service, and you also must be sure to keep the information up-to-date.  Considering the fine will be around $500 GBP, the small charge for the chip will be more than worth it.  Plus, the move is estimated to save animal services and shelters $57 million (GPB) a year.

Dog parents have until April 6th to assure that they are compliant with the new law.  The chip must be fitted by a trained professional.  People can contact The Dogs Trust, the Blue Cross centers, Battersea Dogs and Cats Home, or your local vet or animal shelter for more information.

25 thoughts on “UK Law Requires Dog Parents to “Chip” Their Dogs or Be Fined”

  1. This is a welcome bit of law, in my opinion. BUT…

    Sadly, (or stupidly), there is not law or amendment, that requires anyone to ever scan any dog that is found, to see if they have a chip.

    The UK government were petitioned to add that all dogs found by any agency/person, MUST be scanned for a chip, so as to get the lost dog back to it’s family, the government REFUSED to do this….

    So basically, the chipping of dogs, is for when they want to identify the human “owner” and blame or charge or sue their human for damage that the dog may have done somewhere, NOT for when they want to get a dog back to its family.

    Reply

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