Man Under Investigation After Tattooing His Puppy

KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather

A North Carolina man is under investigation after he gave his four-month-old pit bull a tattoo.

Ernesto Rodriguez says he loves his dog like they were his children. After posting a photo on Facebook of a tattoo he gave his puppy, Duchess, people are questioning that. Rodriguez gave the puppy an intricate tattoo for identification purposes he says. His other dog Duke has one too. “They both have it. Thy both have their tattoos on them just in case anything happens,” said Rodriguez.

Rodriguez says he gave Duchess that tattoo after taking her to the vet to get her ears clipped and he insists that Duchess was asleep for the whole procedure. “I took her to the shop, tattooed her, and she slept the rest of the day,” he said. Animal advocates, like Caleb Scott, don’t think Rodriguez’s story makes sense. “Really that’s kind of suspicious in my mind,” said Scott. “Usually when you pick up a dog or cats they’re already awake after the procedure. They don’t usually hand you over a dog that is asleep.” Scott also thinks Rodriguez’s story has changed. “On his first Facebook post he said he was bored and tattooing. I think now he’s backpedaling, saying he’s identifying it.”

When Rodriguez was asked if he regretted his decision he responded, “No, not at all. I’ll do it again to my next dogs.” Rodriguez stands firm in his decision to tattoo Duchess despite the backlash he’s received from people all over the country. “It’s just like judging someone for wearing a tattoo,” he said. “You judge and you think that they’re bad people. It’s not. It’s just art. I’m an artist, I want to put art on my dogs. She was already asleep, so I took advantage of that.”

Local authorities are investigating after someone filed a complaint. No charges have been filed yet.







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30 comments

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    April 1, 2013 10:47 amPosted 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    I am a animal lover,we have had many dogs in the past,now we have two cats…….. whatever happened to “mind your own business”

    Reply
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    April 1, 2013 10:49 amPosted 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Anonymous, it’s pretty hard to mind our own business when it comes to public news stories. Makes sense?

    Reply
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      April 1, 2013 12:03 pmPosted 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      I agree!! HE was the one who first put this on Facebook!!! To subject an animal to that kind of pain and for as long as that would take is unthinkable!! I have a couple tattoos and I can’t imagine putting the many dags & cats I adopt thru this. People who say they’re animal lovers but have nothing to say about it, or who agree, are NOT animal lovers. The fact that they can inflict PAIN on a defenseless animal proves that!!!! Imbeciles!!!

      Reply
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        April 1, 2013 12:38 pmPosted 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        OH PLEASE!!!!! Show dogs are tattooed all the time for identification. Get over yourselves!

        Reply
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          April 1, 2013 1:07 pmPosted 1 year ago
          drstt

          Show dogs are not tattooed all the time. I have been showing dogs for 20 years and have yet to run into a dog with a tattoo.

          Reply
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          April 1, 2013 2:26 pmPosted 1 year ago
          Jonsey

          You are an IDIOT!!! Please don’t reproduce!!

          Reply
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        April 1, 2013 3:30 pmPosted 1 year ago
        threenorns

        did you actually look at the tattoo? do you honestly think it would be possible to get that kind of detail were the dog conscious for the procedure?

        Reply
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    April 1, 2013 11:05 amPosted 1 year ago
    Brian

    So a number tattooed in the ear is okay but an artistic tattoo is not. Stupid…..

    Reply
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      April 1, 2013 12:29 pmPosted 1 year ago
      Evelyn

      Um, yes, especially when the tattoo given is the equivalent of something that a moron such as he feels is necessary, in a most sensitive area for a dog and in a protracted amount of time to do the bloody work. What men will do to compensate for their own tiny, um, problems.

      Reply
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    April 1, 2013 11:54 amPosted 1 year ago
    Kristin

    When a dog can physically say, “I’d like a tattoo” then i’m fine with it. But for now… get a fucking collar with a license on it. This guy is sick and a liar. Besides… if he loves his dogs like his own children… why would he put this poor dog through needless pain of ear cropping and tattooing. So stupid. His “art” sucks anyway. Not much of a tattoo artist.

    Reply
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      April 1, 2013 3:31 pmPosted 1 year ago
      threenorns

      so it’s okay to core out a dog’s endocrine system without his consent but not not to tattoo him while under anaesthetic?

      Reply
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        April 1, 2013 9:47 pmPosted 1 year ago
        Evelyn

        As one deals with overall health and the other is only to get the owner off, then yes, absolutely. But I have a feeling you are only trying to stir up trouble. Anyone can see this is a stupid thing to do to a dog and does not benefit them at all.

        Reply
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    April 1, 2013 11:56 amPosted 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Easy enough to check with the vet who did the dog’s ears as to whether or not the dog was “awake”…can’t see a squirmy pup staying still long enough to tat anything….
    …..as to the tattoo itself? Nothing wrong with that if done cleanly etc etc

    Reply
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      April 1, 2013 12:06 pmPosted 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      They NEVER release an animal after surgery still asleep!!!! That’s why they’re in RECOVERY for an extended amount of time after surgery…..that is to make sure they DO wake up and have no respiratory problems!!! People will believe anything, from others who will SAY anything!!!

      Reply
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        April 1, 2013 3:33 pmPosted 1 year ago
        threenorns

        i was allowed to be in with my dog while she was unconscious after being spayed. i’m pretty sure that if i’d told the vet “hang on a mo’, i’m just going to tattoo her while she’s under” he wouldn’t have said Word One about it.

        Reply
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    April 1, 2013 12:27 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    A bit of perspective would not go amiss here. His dog looks healthy and happy. So its not on the list of what most people would do to their dogs myself included but there are a lot more worse things going on out there that need investigating before time is used up on this One prime example being Freckles the dog that is currently being brought back from the brink by the heroes at Noah`s arks rescue. The perpetrators of this act should be hunted down and shot

    Reply
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    April 1, 2013 12:58 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Cheryl F

    The idiot is lying. The dog wasn’t sent home asleep, though he may have been sleepy. No dog would “sleep through” any kind of tattoo, much less a large tattoo like that one and as someone else said, in a very delicate location. You want to identify your dog, get it chipped. It’s one thing to tattoo someone who WANTS a tattoo, it’s another to tattoo an animal who cannot give consent.

    Reply
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    April 1, 2013 1:27 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Peggy

    What I am wondering is, what is the tatoo a picture of? It doesn’t really impress me as art. Also, a tattoo on the ear is one thing, but on the softest part of the tummy? That had to hurt. If the dog was under sedation, I don’t see a big deal, but I can’t see a dog laying there letting him do that to it otherwise.

    Reply
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    April 1, 2013 1:48 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Monica

    The point of this story people that AGREE with this idiot, is that the animal was not tatooed for identification. On the ear is a hell of a lot less painful then on the belly of this dog. and what is the purpose of it in the first place?

    This man is an idiot and just did this to satisfy his own macho (or lack of)
    ego.

    Idiot is a NICE word for him.

    Reply
  • April 1, 2013 1:50 pmPosted 1 year ago
    JOn

    You people gotta say “put on a collar” like someone cant simply take off a collar to steal your dog!

    My problem is that the tattoo looks sloppy as if somebody was squirming from the pain.

    Reply
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    April 1, 2013 2:15 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Mary

    You’re all missing the part about having the dogs ears clipped. If God wanted pit bulls to have short ears he would have made him that way. I’ve had tattoos and they are not that painful. If the dog was asleep that’s even better, but clipping a dogs ears and his tail is cruel……personally my dog has a chip to identify him……

    Reply
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      April 1, 2013 3:03 pmPosted 1 year ago
      Jon

      clipping the ears or worse cutting the tail off is horrible! that does make me question this person and his integrity

      Reply
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        April 1, 2013 3:56 pmPosted 1 year ago
        LoupGarouTFTs

        Tail docking is done when the puppy is less than 72 hours old. The nervous system is not yet developed at that point. The puppy does cry when taken from its dam, but does not really notice when the tail is docked and stops crying almost immediately when returned to the dam. Ear cropping is typically done when the puppy is around three months of age. Both remove portions of the dog’s body. However, spaying and neutering is also permanent removal of a portion of the dog’s body and results in the loss of hormone production that is used to regulate physical growth, among other things. Veterinarians will often spay or neuter puppies that have reached two pounds in weight–meaning even my Toy Fox Terrier puppies could be permanently deprived of their hormones when they are between 8 and 10 weeks of age! How is that ethical?

        Reply
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          April 1, 2013 9:24 pmPosted 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          In cats, for example, with spay/neuter, we are trading off whatever negative impact the surgery has on the animal’s endocrine system for a reduction in the birth rate of kittens and the numbers of unwanted and feral cats who live their often short lives without so much and without veterinary care when they are sick or injured. We are aiming to reduce the pain and suffering of future unwanted and feral kittens and cats.

          I do whole heartedly agree that the spay/neuter should not be done until an animal comes very close to sexual maturity. This is what I have done with my cats to give them for as many months as possible, the benefit of their entire endocrine system. My male cat reached sexual maturity at 81/2 months and was neutered the following week. My female was spayed at 71/2 months, and the vet said afterwards that she was just on the verge. At 8 and 12 pounds, they are both very healthy, full-grown cats. I am sure most everyone wishes there were a better way to manage the birth rate, but so far we haven’t found it. Spay/neuter seems to be the lesser of two evils.

          And there are reasons why some people, such as some of the animal rescue groups, spay and neuter kittens at a very early age. To the best of my knowledge, the general public want to adopt very young kittens, rather than the older ones and want an animal which has been spayed or neutered. In order to maximize the kitten’s chance of finding a home, the rescue volunteers get them out very early for adoption, where as conscientious breeders believe that ideally a kitten should remain with its mother and siblings until at least 12 weeks of age. There is a lot to consider, which makes these decisions not so easy. But it is good people are talking about it and thinking about it.

          Reply
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    April 1, 2013 2:57 pmPosted 1 year ago
    kathy

    i dont see a problem with it.dogs have this happen all the time whats the problem.

    Reply
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    April 1, 2013 4:07 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    They tattoo dogs all the time for identification, i dont see a problem with it. As long as its not huge or excessive, they tattoo cattle and freeze brand them and horses! What about all the chemical dyes they use on their skin and what about animal testing for cosmetics, now thats abuse!

    Reply
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    April 1, 2013 8:21 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Having a dog’s ears clipped is barbaric. Veterinarians should refuse to do this. But perhaps they know if they refused, people like this man might carry out the surgery themselves. Identifying tattoos are relatively small, unlike the monstrous mess of ink this man defaced his dog’s body with. I believe it should be against the law for anyone but a veterinarian to give tattoos to pets. This man needs an education about animal cruelty, but I wonder if anything could get through his hardened state of consciousness. And apparently inks used in tattooing today are synthetics which make their way to the liver, little by little, placing a continuous extra burden on the immune system.

    Reply
  • Visit site
    April 1, 2013 8:54 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    In cats, with spay/neuter, we are trading off whatever negative impact the surgery has on the animal’s endocrine system for a reduction in the birth rate of kittens and the numbers of unwanted and feral cats who live their often short lives without so much and without veterinary care when they are sick or injured. We are aiming to reduce the pain and suffering of future unwanted and feral kittens and cats.

    I do whole heartedly agree that the spay/neuter should not be done until an animal comes very close to sexual maturity. This is what I have done with my cats to give them for as many months as possible, the benefit of their entire endocrine system. My male cat reached sexual maturity at 81/2 months and was neutered the following week. My female was spayed at 71/2 months, and the vet said afterwards that she was just on the verge. At 8 and 12 pounds, they are both very healthy, full-grown cats. I am sure most everyone wishes there were a better way to manage the birth rate, but so far we haven’t found it. Spay/neuter seems to be the lesser of two evils.

    And there are reasons why some people, such as some of the animal rescue groups, spay and neuter kittens at a very early age. To the best of my knowledge, the general public want to adopt very young kittens, rather than the older ones and want an animal which has been spayed or neutered. In order to maximize the kitten’s chance of finding a home, the rescue volunteers get them out very early for adoption, where as conscientious breeders believe that ideally a kitten should remain with its mother and siblings until 12 weeks of age. There is a lot to consider, which makes these decisions not so easy. But it is good people are talking about it and thinking about it.

    Reply
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    April 2, 2013 12:08 amPosted 1 year ago
    Rhonda

    It sounds like its all about this man, period. He gets himself what he thinks is a macho dog, gets it a badass tattoo and impresses all his friends. Tattoos hurt, I know btw and would be really painful on a puppy’s tummy.
    If he really cared about identification, like he said, he would microchip and register nationally.
    I feel sorry for his dog.

    Reply
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    April 2, 2013 8:12 amPosted 1 year ago
    Maureen

    Several years ago, we got a dog. Our cat was so terrified of it that she ran right through the screen on our patio door and was gone. We searched for 6 weeks. Finally our town’s animal control office called and said they had her. She was wearing an ID tag with her name, our address and phone number, the town license tag and a tag indicating that she was microchipped by Petnet (now out of business). When they returned her, the charged me for two days of boarding. I asked why, since her phone number was quite visible on her tags and they said her chip didn’t scan at their shelter. They had to take her to a local vet when he reopened on Monday and scan her chip there. They woudn’t release her until they confirmed who her owners were. I guess if a citizen had found her and called the number on the tag it would have been much easier, but if your pet winds up at animal control a collar and tags might not be enough to prove your ownership.

    Reply

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