Bonded “Dogs of Divorce” Desperately Need a Home Together

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Zack and Zoey’s parents are in the midst of a messy divorce.  Their mom wants to keep them, but has been forced to move and is heartbroken that she can’t find somewhere they are welcome.  They are in Charlotte, North Carolina and need a home before they end up in a kill shelter.

“This is a complicated divorce story. Their owner loves them and is truly heartbroken over this! This is not her fault,” says The Life & Times of Tina P., who shared their flier.  “Please let us focus on helping her help her babies! Imagine if you ended up in a bad situation and simply couldn’t keep your furbabies! Would you want to be judged (I am sure she knows she is being judged) or would you want people to rally behind you and help you do the right thing?! Please keep sharing these pups!”

Zack is three years old and Zoey is four.  Zack is a powerhouse who doesn’t realize his strength at times, but he is very silly and loving.  Zoey is also a sweetheart who loves to snuggle and follow her humans around.  Zack is very much attached to his Zoey and gets very depressed if they are separated.

They are both great with kids and up to date on their vaccinations.  Neither is a fan of cats, and Zack is selective about other dogs (likely because he is so protective of Zoey), so it would be best if they were adopted into a home with no other animals.

Anyone who is seriously interested in adopting them should email [email protected].  If you’re in the Charlotte area, you might even allow their mom to see them sometimes!

 

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108 thoughts on “Bonded “Dogs of Divorce” Desperately Need a Home Together”

  1. There are zero “no kill” shelters anywhere. Any facility advertised as a “No Kill” shelter just stops taking animal intakes when they are full and turn away Owner turn in or stray drop offs. Most shelters try very hard not to have to euthanize animals unless extremely sick or hurt, hence the need for rescues, foster families and adoptions. As a board member of a shelter that takes in 26,000 animals a year, with space for only 800, you can imagine our network. We have 1500 animals in foster care and sent over 3000 out to rescues while adopting out 30-50 per day, only to take in an average of 75 a day.

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