Disqualified: Bulldog and Pekingese Fail Crufts Vet Checks

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No dog representing the Pekingese and Bulldog were allowed to compete in Thursday evening’s Best in Group competitions at Crufts after they failed the new veterinary checks that have been introduced to the show.

The Best of Breed award was not given to Pekingese, Palacegarden Bianca, or Bulldog, Mellowmood One In A Million, following their veterinary checks, which were carried out by an independent veterinary surgeon. This means that the dogs will not be allowed to continue into the Toy or Utility Best in Group competitions respectively.

The Kennel Club has introduced veterinary checks for the Best of Breed winners at all Kennel Club licensed General and Group Championship Dog Shows from Crufts 2012 onwards, in 15 designated high profile breeds. This measure was introduced to ensure that Best of Breed awards are not given to any dogs that show visible signs of problems due to conditions that affect their health or welfare.

The fifteen high profile breeds are as follows: Basset Hound, Bloodhound, Bulldog, Chow Chow, Clumber Spaniel, Dogue De Bordeaux, German Shepherd Dog, Mastiff, Neapolitan Mastiff, Pekingese, Shar Pei, St Bernard, French Bulldog, Pug and Chinese Crested.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “We are determined to ensure that the show ring is a positive force for change and that we help to move breeds forward by only rewarding the healthiest examples of a breed.”

“The veterinary checks were introduced to ensure that dogs with exaggerated features do not win prizes. The independent veterinary surgeon decided that the Pekingese and Bulldog should not pass their checks and therefore they did not receive their Best of Breed awards and will not be representing their breeds in the remainder of the competition.”

0 thoughts on “Disqualified: Bulldog and Pekingese Fail Crufts Vet Checks”

  1. I heard this news earlier and I was thrilled!! At last, a real step in the right direction for these despicable breeders who inflict such pain and misery on their puppies. A pat on the back for the vet involved too, it must have still been quite daunting for them to make this decision, as they are the first to do so in Crufts history 🙂

    Reply
    • I have to ask, what are you talking about? If anyone “despicable” inflicts “pain and misery” on dogs, it’s puppy mills, backyard breeders and the stupid people that impulsively buy from them, then scream and blame the entire breed when something inevitably goes wrong with their poor dog.

      The vast majority of breeders present at Crufts are the tiny minority who are actually voluntarily health-testing their dogs and who have happy, well-adjusted animals to show for their years of care and dedication to their breeds.

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      • Most breeders are passionate about their dogs, and really do care about their health and fitness. We still have to remember that breeding dogs is a business. It involves a huge investment in time, breeding stock, showing, travel, etc.
        That being said, some genetic defect to the foundation stock could blow the whole breeding program, and could put someone out of business. There would be a huge temptation to let something pass if it was discovered by one’s own vet, but wasn’t apparent in the outside appearance of the dog. I wouldn’t call it “despicable”, but it is human.

        Reply
  2. Now to “fix” the poor GSD 🙁 I saw their “Best in Breed” on Westminster and I damn near cried! what they’ve done to their hind ends is criminal. Poor thing was walking on it’s hocks, and the crowd was cheering!

    Reply
    • I have been grieving about the GSD for many years. Why judges even recognize a dog who is so broken down in the rear is beyond me.

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    • Here in South Africa there are two distinct types of GSD’s those bred for the “beauty” ring and those for the “sporting” ring (or Working Dogs).

      The former have this awful sloping back end and the latter are nearly all “square” dogs who MUST have hip and elbow clearance before breeding and if not – then the litter will not be registered. They also have to be DNA tested.

      Even people (like me) who buy a “Sport dog” and may sterilise because they do not want to breed have their animals X-rayed at 15 / 18 months to make sure they are clear.

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    • There was a video documentary a few years ago about the big dog shows. They did a bit about the GSD. They showed video of a breed winner weaving and stumbling around to a AKC mucky muck and he vehemently agreed that the dog was a wonderful example of the GSD. They then showed him a video of a breed dog that could not hop onto stairs as it was too wobbly. Again thrilled with the dog’s confimation. I am at a loss how any human can watch a GSD breed to this extreme and think they move well. They walk on thier hocks which produces huge strain on the joints. I think it is cruel to disfigure but the brains at AKC think it’s beautiful. I wonder if they are inbred too?

      Reply
      • When I was a kid, I hung out at a GSD kennel along with a few other kids. We would run those dogs ragged – and they could run then – and of course, we were socializing them to kids too. Smart breeder. They were beautiful, sound GSD’s and yes, Champions. Many years later I took my son to a dog show. “Wait until you see the GSD’s!” I said “They are truly beautiful dogs.” I ended up asking a handler what breed that was she was showing…it didn’t look or act like a GSD to me! I’ve seen many since – show dogs – and I can’t stand to watch them try to move. Nor am I pleased with their whining, wussy temperments.
        How could Judges let this happen? How could they possibly encourage deformity? How could breeders be so blinded by the prize as to kowtow to these Judges?
        To me, dog shows and breeders/etc are supposed to uphold the Standard to KEEP the breed the way its supposed to be – health and temperment included. This would be a good thing. I don’t understand where it all went wrong.

        Reply
    • Yes. The “Show” German Shepherds are disgusting to look at. No wonder Hip displasia is prevelant in the breed.

      Reply

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