Dog Friendly Grand Canyon National Park

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Buster and Ty, your faithful pet travel correspondents, coming to you today from the Grand Canyon:

Ty: I love it when we go to a national park, because it means DOGGY NAP TIME!

Buster: It’s a bummer! We’re stuck inside the RV because most trails in the national parks are closed to dogs – something about keeping us safe they say.

Ty: That’s fine with me. I need my beauty sleep.

Buster: But you didn’t get it at the Grand Canyon. Hmmm, that may explain some things …

Ty: It’s true – DogMa and DogPa walked our paws off!

Buster: Yea! Wasn’t it GREAT?!? The thirteen-mile South Rim Trail is partially paved and entirely dog friendly. We learned a few things while we were there to share with our doggy friends.

Ty: First, the bushes smell really good. Better than your average bushes.

Smelling Bushes

Buster: Second, the squirrels are evil. More evil than your average squirrels.

Squirrel on the Edge

Ty: Third, there is no fence along the edge and that last step is a doozy – so be careful.

Grand Canyon - Looking Down

Buster: Fourth, dogs are only allowed on the Rim Trail, not on any of the trails down into the canyon. That’s fine with us – the views are best from up here.

Buster at the Grand Canyon

Ty: Fifth, bring water and snacks because you’re likely to get hungry ….

Sharing a snack

Ty: … REALLY hungry!

Watch your fingers

Buster: Though we haven’t been there ourselves, we understand that the North Rim of the Grand Canyon is not as pet friendly – dogs are only allowed on the Bridle Trail and part of the Arizona Trail.

Ty: So, if your people really love you, they’ll bring you to the South Rim on vacation. It’s something every dog should see at least once in their life. Check out Dogs Dig the Grand Canyon for more pet travel tips.

18 thoughts on “Dog Friendly Grand Canyon National Park”

  1. Makes sense – it wouldn’t costs a fortune to get there from England either – the dogs would enjoy the quarantine too.

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  2. Just don’t be stupid. Take LOTS of water for YOU AND the DOG. Also, if you’re hiking in hot weather, don’t pour water on your dog’s back if it’s overweight with a flatter back. Water can pool there and boil the skin. I saw the nastiest burn because of that when working at animal hospital in AZ.

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  3. will definately look into this 🙂 also yosemeti national park (for all you, like me, that refuse to go on vacation without the doggies) is also dog friendly. dogs are allowed on any concrete path and most of the falls have this. my dog lucy enjoyed every second of it a couple of years ago. its very shady and after hours of walking around the park, was down for the count (zzzzzzzzzz) two minutes after getting back to our room 🙂

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  4. Pets are my life! I love them so much! I truely LOVE THIS CUTE LIL SHORT STORY THAT HAS A HUGE MEANING FOR ALL THE LIL FURRY PEOPLE IN THE WORLD!

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  5. I’m in AZ with my two furball eskies; we have the Swamp Cooler Dog Vest (by Ruff Wear)…it works AWESOME. It’s like they are hiking in 70 degrees instead of 100 degrees.

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