Five Lucky Dogs Get Dog Houses before Christmas

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We all know that not all dogs are lucky enough to have a home. Some are homeless and some are house pets. Among those house pets there are some that get to live a cozy life inside warm homes with their humans, while others spend their entire lifetime chained in backyards exposed to the elements. Well, this winter, five outside dogs in the Atlanta area are each getting a dog house of their own, all thanks to teenagers from the Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice.

Photo Credit: Rescue 2 Restore
Photo Credit: Rescue 2 Restore

 

Rescue 2 Restore, a program at the Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice, and the “Breaking Chains” program at the Atlanta-based Lifeline Animal Project, have come together to give incarcerated youth an opportunity to acquire life skills like carpentry, and help animals in need.

Young residents at DJJ’s Sumter Youth Development Center (YDC) built five dog houses featuring elevated floors and shingled, slanted roofs for maximum warmth and protection from the elements. These dog houses were delivered on November 4, 2014, to pet owning families that cannot afford appropriate shelter for their pets and who live in Atlanta’s low income areas.

The picture on the left shows how one of the recipients lived before getting the dog house. Photo Credit: Rescue 2 Restore
The picture on the left shows how one of the recipients lived before getting the dog house.
Photo Credit: Rescue 2 Restore

 

Lifeline Animal Project’s program “Breaking Chains,” provides resources and education to Atlanta residents whose pets would otherwise always live their lives outside, tethered by a chain. Rescue 2 Restore teaches incarcerated teens life skills while educating them about animal care and compassion.

Delivering the dog houses. Photo Credit: Rescue 2 Restore
Delivering the dog houses. Photo Credit: Rescue 2 Restore

 

On delivery day, the Department of Juvenile Justice Commissioner Avery Niles accompanied two Sumter Youth Development Center students to deliver the dog houses to the Lifeline Animal Project. Both teens expressed their gratitude for being able to assist Lifeline in this lifesaving mission and provide appropriate shelter for dogs in need.

This was the first time Lifeline Animal Project and Rescue 2 Restore worked together to build dog houses. Both organizations plan to continue working together and change the lives of many more dogs in need.

35 thoughts on “Five Lucky Dogs Get Dog Houses before Christmas”

  1. That’s great! Kudos to the teens….and I honestly mean that I think it’s wonderful. But from the dogs perspective I bet they’d like a family that treats them like a family member with lots of cuddles and a soft warm couch to lay on instead of treating them like a lawn ornament a lot better.

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  2. I guess you could call them lucky. living outside alone no pack to call their own. If it were me, I think I would prefer to be euthanized rather than live that way. Lucky like so many out there.

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  3. Too bad they can’t give them a caring family – they need to be with their pack. Good for these kids, but it is a bandaid on the real problem.

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  4. If you can’t bring your dog inside, you should be left outside to brave the elements next to your loyal dog. Pieces of human garbage!

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