Identity Withheld for Gun-Pulling City Officer

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The identity of a Baltimore City police officer who pulled his gun on a dog at Annie’s Playground in March is being withheld by the Harford County Sheriff’s Office.

Patch filed a Public Information Act request for the officer’s identity, but was denied on grounds that the request was “an unwarranted invasion of privacy” and revealing the information could “endanger the life or physical safety of an individual.”

The officer, whose name is blacked out in the sheriff’s incident report, is listed as the victim on the police report. But no charges were filed against the woman whose dog approached the officer’s family. A Baltimore City Police Department spokesman said the officer was not disciplined internally.

Police initially said the officer did not pull his gun and that a report was not written. After inquiries from Patch, though, police released a written report that stated the man did pull his gun. A spokeswoman for the sheriff’s office said that both parties involved in the incident left the playground “cordially.”

Lisa Vecchioni, the woman who had the dog and is listed as a “suspect” on the report, said that was not the case. Her name was also blacked out, but she contacted Patch to complain about the incident.

“He pulled the gun out immediately, didn’t even give a chance to see if the dog was friendly or not,” Vecchioni told Patch on March 25. “He had a gun pointed at my dog, I had to cross between my dog and him with the gun pointed at my dog. … It was definitely pointed at me.”

The dog is listed as an 80-pound “pitbull mix” on the police report, but Vecchioni said it weighs about 40 pounds and is primarily a Labrador mix.

Sincere thanks to Patch editor Brad Gerick for granting Life With Dogs permission to republish content.

6 thoughts on “Identity Withheld for Gun-Pulling City Officer”

  1. Ok, this really gets my blood boiling!

    This is clearly an over reactive police officer who needs to be disciplined. Just because a dog approaches you doesn’t mean he is a danger. Makes me wonder how poorly this guy assess complex situations under stress when he is on duty.

    But, what makes me even more angry is how the Baltimore City police dept. protected this officer and tried to hide all the details of the incident. And officials wonder why the public trust has deteriorated toward law enforcement in recent years.

    Thank goodness Lisa Vecchioni and her dog are ok. This police officer and his police dept. are a disgrace.

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  2. psycho police officers eh? jeez wearing a badge doesnt give you the right to shot at whatever crosses your path dumbass!

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  3. I lived next door to a county sheriff for a few years before he died (off duty accident) This man was terrified of dogs. He told me he hated dogs. I have seen him swerve his car towards a neighborhood dog who thankfully jumped out of his way in time. My point is here is a person who legally carries a gun and can legally shoot (and possibly kill) just because he “feels” threatened by something that he has an warranted fear of. So my question for police officers who shoot or even just aim their guns at dogs is…”Were you actually threatened? Or were you just afraid? There is a huge difference.

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