Neglected Dog Loses 30 Pounds to Emergency Haircut

Life With Dogs is reader-supported. We may earn a small commission through products purchased using links on this page.

The Wood Green animal shelter in Godmanchester says it’s the worst case of neglect they’ve encountered.

An unrecognizable old English sheepdog was found after it was dumped in front of the shelter. Blinded by matted fur and unable to hear, the terrified dog was wrapped in a cocoon of 30 pounds of tangled hair that literally threatened to kill him. Two-inch long claws made walking a chore, and the dog was unable to hear through the mats surrounding his head.

A team of vets and nurses freed the dog from his painful state by giving him a haircut –  a two hour emergency procedure that included nail trimming and removal of cysts and grass seeds from his ears and paws.

.

.

photos ©SWNS

‘Floyd’ is estimated to be ten years old, and Wood Green shelter workers say they don’t think he has ever been groomed in his life. In fact, his skin was so damaged that they don’t believe his coat will recover and grow back. Vets will now begin the process of addressing other lingering issues – Floyd will require extensive dental work, eye, ear and skin treatments, but is said to be recovering well, enjoying his freedom after spending years imprisoned by his own coat.

37 thoughts on “Neglected Dog Loses 30 Pounds to Emergency Haircut”

  1. Whoever did this to this poor dog needs to be punished. This is terrible. I hope that he recovers and that the damage is not as bad as the vets think. Good luck big boy.

    Reply
  2. My family has always had sheepdogs, all rescues, so I know first-hand the grooming care that they require. They are AMAZING dogs and my heart goes out to this guy. I hope he recovers well and finds his forever home. The pain that people put animals through never ceases to amaze me.

    Reply
  3. I think the law should dictate the following for animal abusers: “whatever you do to the animal shall be done to you, just so you can experience the pain that you’ve inflicted on another living creature”

    Reply
    • Yes Jill murfin, I have always thought that is the best way to teach people like them. It may never show them to like animals, but it would teach them to stop hurting them.

      Reply
    • Jill, If only we could do it, but what human would/could do the kind of torture and abuse than an evil monster like them inflict on an innocent animal?

      Reply
    • Oh, I SO agree! I am a nurse and I don’t seem to mind hurting to help humans, but I can not bear to see an animal abused. Research is showing that one of the first clues to a serial killer in the making is creulty to animals. I love all the forensic stuff, but I could not watch the show about how those people abuse animals long before humans become their targets.

      Reply
  4. I had a client a few years ago whose dog was barely able to walk because his coat was so matted. He kept coming around me so I could pet him and the owner would shoo him off or put him outside in the cold. I think the owner was embarassed to have me see how neglected the poor animal was. I’m such an animal lover, it killed me to see this! I made some timid remarks about the dog to the owner in hopes that it would soften him to his dog’s discomfort. I have two dogs of my own currently, always have had dogs, and it breaks my heart when I see neglect and abuse. And yes, I reported them to the animal control. These were educated people with the means to take care of their animals!

    Reply
    • Why be timid, you should have spoken up and/or taken the dog the first time you saw it in that kind of condition. Or made sure that animal control responded that first day. Anyone who sees an animal in pain or discomfort and does nothing is as bad as the owner in my opinion.

      Reply
      • Geeze, be thankful the person above contacted animal control, lots of people wouldn’t have bothered to do that. To say they were as bad as the owner just because they handled it differently from how you would is just plain silly. Judge not lest ye be judged…

        Reply
    • Some people may not like this, but when I was younger I would take pets like this first chance I got and God was on my side because I always found them great homes, and we know how hard that can be sometimes. The people who caught me, about two of them, I would tell” You can report me, but you will be facing charges also” and they let it go.

      Reply
      • Good for you Patt-Galye I did that once many years ago. I took a kitten that was left to run around wild by herself even though she was only 6 weeks old. Saw her running atound outside with a badly swollen front paw, took her in , took her to the vet , found new home, even paid for spaying when she came of age. The people who owned her never even looked for her .

        Reply
  5. What a shame that Floyd was forced to live this way for such a long period of time. I pray that he has sight and the ability to hear after the removal of the matted hair. The article didn’t say if those senses were restored, only that he would need eye & ear treatments. HUGE thanks to the staff at Wood Green Shelter, as well as Shelters everywhere, for the wonderful work they are doing on the behalf of animals; our pets, our friends, our family.

    Reply
  6. I totally agree with Jill!!! Whatever is done to the animal SHOULD be done to the abuser!!! I’d love to be a judge for ALL animal abusers…..they’d NEVER get off lightly!!!!

    Reply

Leave a Comment