Dangerous Dogs and The Slippery Slope of Labeling

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Eight years ago, a Siberian Husky in Texas chased a duck into a pond. A neighbor complained to the city of Plano, and to this day Sasha continues to live under court imposed restrictions reserved for truly dangerous dogs.

When I wrote those words in November, Chris Dunne had just filed a lawsuit against the city of Plano in order to clear Sasha’s name and have the dangerous label discarded. The city maintained that it was necessary for Dunne to line his property with dangerous dog signs in order to keep citizens safe, and Dunne was eventually cited for not having enough signs in place.

Fast forward to yesterday. Dunne had his day in court, and the outcome is disappointing. Dallasnews.com reported that Dunne lost his bid to have Sasha removed from Plano’s dangerous dog list, and was fined $200 for not having sufficient signage posted on his property.

$200 for not protecting his neighbors from his duck chasing dog.

Obviously, Sasha is not a dangerous dog, and as frustrating and inappropriate as the label may be, it’s the city’s policy that has this blogger’s hackles up: once declared dangerous, there are no provisions for having a dog reevaluated or removed from the list. Dogs unfairly branded have no defense or protection. And Plano has no plans to do anything about it.

Labeled for life, Sasha will live out her days with her devoted and defeated owner, unaware of the controversy that surrounds her, and blissfully unaware of the fact that in my opinion, Plano, Texas is not worthy of having her.

35 thoughts on “Dangerous Dogs and The Slippery Slope of Labeling”

  1. I’m sorry for this guy, even more so for his dog. I’m not a fan of any city that would ever apply such a law to a dog that chased, or maybe always chased, ducks. Did he kill them all or something? Is it me, or have far too many people in authority completely lost their bearings? There are days when I think there must be such a thing as a stupid pill. As for the neighbor who went out of his or her way to cause so much trouble – there’s always one, isn’t there.

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    • I think it is ridiculas, big deal he chased the duck does not say he killed the duck just chased, wonder if they thought maybe he was just playin, the duck at any time could of flew away I would imagine well I think it is extreemly unfair to label that dog unfair and unfounded. but this world judges everything, its sickening it makes me feel shame about people. I wont say no more

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  2. Sasha looks so much like our Dakota. What a shame – such a nice dog and a wonderful owner!

    Woos ~ Phantom, Thunder, and Ciara

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  3. He should move to a less ridiculous city, or county depending on the jurisdiction of his court order. Or he could make ENORMOUS signs in completely obnoxious colors and plant them all.over.his.entire.yard so that all the neighbors have to look at them.

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  4. OGL!!! Come on people in government! Sasha can be a “dangerous dog” to me …. Her loving and kisses look like the kind of danger I want and need in my life – any time day or night – bring it on baby!!!! 😀 Love going out to Sasha and her papa – sweet to see – thanks for sharing the video! Sorry about the legal stuff … 🙁

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  5. What a crock-o-shit! Our politicians waste more time and energy on things that they have zero knowledge about. I wonder if they consulted a dog behaviorist before enacting this? I doubt it as that would require them to actually care about doing a good job for their citizens. This just steams me to no end! I really thought they had a chance of clearing her name. We all know she deserves it.

    If we could get the media to stop the sensational headlines every time there is an incident of dogs biting the average person would not allow this to happen. They conveniently leave out very important information when reporting them just so they can sell a newspaper. Rarely do dogs bite without being attacked first without provocation, it is not in their nature. This has been proven with rehabilitated fighting dogs.

    Oh someday my dog brotheren will no longer be wrongfully persecuted…..

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  6. My city is in the process of re-writing their extremely outdated dog laws. The option proposed by a member of the city council was a breed specific ban. The mayor and the rest of the council countered with re-writing the laws to include dangerous dog, and potentially dangerous dog ordinances (which IS an improvement over banning breeds, despite it’s faults). I sent this article along to the subcommittee in charge of the re-write so that they will know to include a re-evaluation provision. This won’t help Sasha, but maybe it will help other dogs in the future.

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  7. Those in “power” sicken me when they do not look at issues from all sides and instead sit blindly with their eyes down, looking at the papers in front of them that say “This is what we do and you can’t change it, so stop thinking.”

    Exactly what part of “public service” don’t they get?

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