Prop B Revisited: Breeders, Activists Face Off at MO State Capital

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Dog breeders and welfare activists clashed over potential revisions to Proposition B for the second day at the state Capitol in Jefferson City on Wednesday. Opponents testified before the Missouri Senate Agriculture Committee on bills that would modify or repeal Prop B. Sponsors of the bills claim that it unfairly targets licensed breeders, and not the unlicensed breeders who dodge regulation.

Senator Mike Parsons, a cattle farmer, has proposed a bill changing the criminal provisions of Proposition B and giving breeders time to correct violations before being charged.

The Humane Society of Missouri continues to voice strong opposition to any changes to Prop B. Humane Society of Missouori president Kathy Warnick issued the following statement: “We feel the components of Proposition B are right on track with making the existence for an animal in a breeding facility humane and decent, and it is not at present.”

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2 thoughts on “Prop B Revisited: Breeders, Activists Face Off at MO State Capital”

  1. This is a very touchy subject for breeders even good reputable breeders. I have heard good arguments on both sides but I have to say the regulations are in the best interest of the animals and I really like that! Yes it is difficult to comply with the regulations but don’t be mad at the law be mad at all the jerks that abused and neglected animals that caused this law to be enacted. We have all seen the horrific treatment that cows and chickens have received recently at the hands of slaughter house workers. Lets not forget the movie coming out about “Madonna of The Mills” rescuing dogs from horrific conditions in puppy mills. We cannot stop thinking about the animals and what type of life they have to endure. Just because you view the animal as one big dollar sign doesn’t mean that that animal doesn’t deserve a happy loving home to live in. I know for a fact that Chickens that are free range and grass feed taste far better than the caged ones at Foster Farms. Living conditions of your animals can improve the product you are offering the consumer.

    It is our responsibility to ensure the animals that are in our care, whether for companionship, service, consumption or production/breeding be treated in the utmost humane ways, PERIOD! Think about it, if you really had compassion for living creatures you would not be putting your profit before the living conditions of the animals in your care.

    It is our responsibility as CONSUMERS to ensure the things we buy come from places that truly care for their animals and ensure they are not confined for extensive periods and can freely run, play and live a fulling life. We have to research companies before we throw our money into a system that perpetuates abuse. Because by doing this we condone the abuse and therefore are just as guilty as those wielding the stick.

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  2. I hope with all my heart that this bill passes, any person who makes a living out of making a female dog produce litter after litter is disgusting. There are enough unwanted dogs and cats dying each and every day in shelters ALL OVER THE COUNTRY because of over breeding. Not to mention the “puppy mills” – a law like this is needed to stop this madness. Maybe than if more laws were introduced to protect animals than maybe we wouldn’t need so many shelters. Breeders even if they are licensed SHOULD BE LIMITED TO HOW MANY LITTERS THEY CAN PRODUCE in any given year. If they cannot make a living on the reduced number of litters that they can have – than have them go get a job like the rest of us. All you need to do is walk through an animal shelter and look into the soulful eyes of those waiting to be adopted inside those cages, most you know are going to die. I am sorry if people do not agree with me but it breaks my heart to know how many young, innocent and beautiful animals die each day because there are not enough “forever homes’ to take them. Breeders need to understand this – work with the shelters to find homes for those dogs and cats all ready here, don’t breed more!!!!

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