Siberian Husky on Death Row Fights for Life and Freedom

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On the morning of March 1, 2013, the Jones family from Chili, NY, was preparing to their children off to school when their pets Rocco, a German Shepherd/Siberian Husky mix, and Chloe, a Siberian Husky, broke a steel tie out in their yard and got loose. Unfortunately, while the dogs were unattended, a cat lost his life. Rocco and Chloe have been accused of killing the feline and faced being put down, but the Jones family fought proving one of their pets’ innocence, Chloe is still on death row.

Chloe Photo Credit: Helen Klimeck-Jones
Chloe
Photo Credit: Helen Klimeck-Jones

“As the owners of these dogs, we would like to make it known that we acknowledge responsibility for our dogs’ escape,” said Helen Klimeck-Jones, owner of both dogs. “However, there is no evidence that the dogs tangled with any animal–no blood, no scratches, nothing except the cat owners’ testimony.”

The cat lived 3/4 of a mile away from the Jones’s home. He was a 9-years-old outdoor cat. The feline would come to the property for breakfast but during the rest of the day he ran free.

“After the incident, the cat ran off and disappeared for 24 hours,” said Helen. “The cat owner says that the two dogs were tearing the cat up, but there was no evidence of blood or scratches on either dog.”

After filing a report with Animal Control, Rocco and Chloe were picked up and taken into custody. Rocco was released on April 8, 2013, but according to Helen, the release was only possible after the Jones were “coerced into pleading guilty rather than have both of the dogs executed.”

Chloe is detained at a local animal hospital but fortunately, she receives excellent care by hospital staff and the Jones are able to visit her daily.

Helen said her dog Chloe has been portrayed as guilty even when there is insufficient evidence to support this claim. The cat’s owner gave his testimony at the sentencing hearing and presented a photograph of some fur tufts in his yard. He also showed photographs of the cat’s body taken by the veterinary hospital 24 hours after the incident occurred.

“We do have foxes and coyotes in our area. Anything could have happened in that 24 hour period,” said Helen.

Something else that worries the dog’s owner is the possibility of a bias against her pet and the breed.

Rocco and Chloe Photo Credit: Helen Klimeck-Jones
Rocco and Chloe
Photo Credit: Helen Klimeck-Jones

 

“The cat owner is a deputy in the county sheriff’s office and a neighbor of the town supervisor.  I feel that he was given some level of preferential treatment,” said Helen. “At the request of the town justice, we hired an animal trainer to evaluate both dogs to determine if they are/were dangerous, but the justice did not listen to the behavior specialist’s report and had already made up his mind to the sentence before we walked into court.  The town justice says that the town of Chili is no place for huskies, and the town supervisor says that [Chloe] will never come back to Chili.”

With the help of the Lexus Project, the Jones hope to prove Chloe’s innocence in an appeal yet to be scheduled. They anticipate Chloe will be allowed to go back home, but if the Joneses lose the appeal, Chloe will be executed. Another option is to have Chloe be re-homed, possibly out of state or placed in a sanctuary.

If you would like to learn more and follow the case visit Help Save Chloe and Rocco.

 

9 thoughts on “Siberian Husky on Death Row Fights for Life and Freedom”

  1. I have a Siberian husky exactly like Chloe only mine is a male and I can tell you it is not in a huskies nature to kill unless trained. Mine is three years old and we got him when he was 7 months old from an obusive puppy mill so to say and I was frightened he would be aggressive because of the terrible .’.treatment he received but he was so loving and the biggest suck ever. I did research on the breed and every thing I learnt about their loving, friendly nature is true. My neighbors have two and they want to pl.ay with other dogs harmlessly as well. I can’t see this poor husky Chloe being able to do such a vigil’s
    act least of all a kitty cat .We have rabbits, squirrels and yes the odd skunk in the back yard and He
    Hemi will bark once or twice to scare them off. Please let her go and I’m sure you’ll have made the right decision.

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  2. My heart goes out to you and your family as you try to make sense out this situation. I
    cannevaluteot fathom what is it like for your family. I would be so angry at the cat’s ownersand scared that my dog would not be able to come home. It seems really odd that the powers that be would force you to choose between your pets. It must be so confusing for Rosco to wonder where his friend is.
    As I read your story, I thought it was very unfair to pass judgement on these 2 dogs. I hope and pray that someone with a higher level of authority can over turn the bias judgement given to these dogs. What Chloe must be feeling. Don’t stop fighting for your dogs. Take it to the media or the newspaper so some pressure on thes people. What they are trying to do is so unfair. you have done your homework by getting the dogs evaluatethe dogs. I hope and pray that you will have a happy ending.

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  3. Why shouldnt the owner of the cat be forced to take some responsibility. When you allow your cats to roam outdoors you are putting them at risk for many dangers.

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  4. Some dogs do indeed have what’s called “prey drive” however they don’t mangle their prey as it is stated in the article. When prey is mangled that normally means there was either a very severe fight or it was killed for food. Two (from the looks of it) healthy huskies don’t have a reason to mangle. The most I could see is a chase and possible accidental death but from the description I’d vote more towards the cat dying of being a coyote kill. Cats if left outside will most likely not die of natural causes. The cat owner should be accountable for the death. Regardless, without blatant proof of the incident no judge should be appointing a death sentence.

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