Woman Finds Dog after Eight Years

Life With Dogs is reader-supported. We may earn a small commission through products purchased using links on this page.

kokiSheryl Jans of Illinois hasn’t seen her dog Koki in nearly a decade, but she never gave up hope. Now eight years later she has found out that Koki is still alive, just all the way in Hawaii. Now Jans is trying to raise the funds to bring Koki back to her.

When Jans broke up with her ex-partner he got custody of Koki.  Jans hoped she would see Koki again though and kept herself listed as the owner on Koki’s microchip just in case.

“I was like, ‘Well, nothing will happen,’ but you know, just on that one chance, the one percent chance that anything did happen, they would contact me, and then that’s what happened,” said Jans.

On June 27th Jans was driving when her best friend called her and told her to pull over. Koki had been found and was at the Kona Humane Shelter all the way in Hawaii. Jans couldn’t believe it. Koki’s microchip had led the shelter workers to Jans and the microchip company had contacted her best friend who was listed as the emergency contact.

Jans suspected her ex-partner took Koki to Hawaii and abandoned her. After some investigating she discovered her ex has been missing for several months and his mom dumped Koki. Now Jans is working on getting Koki home to Illinois safely. A generous couple in Hawaii is taking Koki in until Jans can fly out and get Koki home.

Because Koki is a Boston terrier and has a snub-nose she can’t fly in the cargo hold. There is only one airline, Hawaiian Air, which will let Koki stay in the cabin. So Jans is fundraising so she can fly to Hawaii and bring Koki home. She needs to raise $5,200 for the trip. So far she has raised about half of the money she needs. Any extra money she raises she plans to give to the Humane Shelter in Kona and to the people who have been caring for Koki so they can foster other animals.

To help bring Koki home visit Jans’ GiveForward page here.

0 thoughts on “Woman Finds Dog after Eight Years”

  1. This is a great story and so close to a happy ending. However would it not be cheaper to advertise for a person in Hawaii to accompany Koki on a flight to US mainland. That way costs would be minimal 🙂

    Reply
  2. Why does Sheryl have to go to Hawaii at all, hundreds of people leave Hawaii everyday. I’m sure a lot of them would be more then happy to help after they have Koki’s story. Also the microchipping company could possibly help out, this is really great FREE publicity for them.

    Reply
  3. I had the same idea. I’m sure someone flying back would be happy to bring him home. The airline wouldn’t charge much. He could fly free if the passenger can convince the airline he’s a therapy dog.

    Reply
  4. Something is VERY WRONG with this picture. I hate to sound skeptical but, Hawaii has a stringent QUARANTINE for dogs regardless of what island it will live on. The reason for the quarantine is because there is NO rabies on the islands. Unless you’re crossing national borders, you don’t usually need to worry about special restrictions on taking your dog with you. But if you want to take your pet for a tropical vacation, you need to know that Hawaii quarantines all dogs – except guide and service dogs that meet certain require-ments – when they enter the state. The current quarantine period is 120 days, 30 days, or up to five days, depending on what rabies testing is done before the dog arrives in Hawaii.
    Special Hawaii Rules
    Unless you’re crossing national borders, you don’t usually need to worry about special restrictions on taking your dog with you. But if you want to take your pet for a tropical vacation, you need to know that Hawaii quarantines all dogs – except guide and service dogs that meet certain require-ments – when they enter the state. To qualify for the five-days-or-less quarantine,
    the dog must have received at least two rabies vaccinations, not less than three months apart, the most recent one between 90 days and a year before arriving in Hawaii
    the dog must have had a microchip identification implanted by a veterinarian, and
    a blood sample, identified by the microchip ID number, must have been tested for rabies antibodies 120 days to 18 months before the dog arrives in the state.
    There are many detailed rules about what paperwork is required and when fees must be paid. Make sure you get all the information you need well in advance – keep in mind that there’s a 120-day waiting period after the blood test – so that the process goes smoothly.

    Not only do you have to give up your pet, you have to pay for it: the current cost is $1,080 for 120 days, $655 for 30 days, or $224 for five days or less, payable when the dog arrives in Honolulu. Airlines deliver pets directly to a state holding facility, and the state takes them to the quarantine station on the island of Oahu. Dogs are kept in individual outdoor runs. Owners can visit their dogs during afternoon visiting hours but cannot take the animals out of the kennel.

    Reply
  5. This is outrageous. This poor lady is being taken advantage of. I rescue and place dogs all over the world. I have never paid more than $650. I will be happy to help find a flight volunteer and deal with the airlines to get this dog home safe for far far less than $5200. $500 max.

    Reply
  6. I’m working on it too. I’m asking a few American Airlines pilots if they know anything about this. Why can’t he ride in the cargo area in a crate like other dogs? Are they afraid he won’t be able to breathe due to his pug nose. I hate flying my dogs but I had too once. BEFORE I rescued (16 years ago), we flew our 7 week old Lab puppy from British Columbia to Miami. She was in a crate, in the cargo area, too young for shots and no quarantine in Miami. It costs $75. now

    Reply
  7. I checked with an American pilot last night and he said they stopped taking dogs in the cargo area during the summer time because they usually get left on the ramp too long by baggage handlers. That’s why I never wanted to fly my dogs. Too many get over heated because they’re left on the ramp. If it’s not a non stop flight it’s dangerous. Get someone who is flying back here to bring him along on one of the airline who will let him ride in the cabin. If he’s a therapy dog, they must let him ride in the cabin….detects sugar levels too high in diabetics, alerts when owner starts to have a seizure, companion for anyone who has a panic disorder.

    Reply

Leave a Comment