“But if We Don’t Adopt Her, No One Else Will!”

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5.18.14 - But if We Don't Adopt Her No One Else Will1

One husband’s story about the listless senior dog that his wife insisted on bringing home from the shelter, and how they got much more out of her than he ever could have imagined.

“Are you sure you want to adopt that dog? She is so lethargic,” I said to my wife, Mary Ann. Indeed, the downcast, sad-eyed, liver -and-white female German short-haired pointer presented a most pathetic sight.

“But if we don’t adopt her, no one else will,” Mary Ann quickly replied, “And you know what will happen to her then? And besides she is already old — look at that gray muzzle!”

Alas, I succumbed to Mary Ann’s wishes and we completed the necessary paperwork along with paying the $35 adoption fee. The dog was ours, or rather my wife’s — as I firmly informed her. The SPCA worker had to use all of her powers of persuasion to coax the extremely reluctant animal out of her cage and on to a waiting leash.

Throughout this whole process, I thought: Oh boy, Here we go again. My wife never met an abandoned dog that she did not want to bring home. She has possessed this tendency throughout our 45-year marriage. But all the previous dogs Mary Ann had brought into our home, each proved animated and anxious to bond with us from the onset.

Not Sadie, however — at least not initially.

But then something strange happened as we walked Sadie into the parking lot, outside of the SPCA complex. All of a sudden, her whole demeanor changed. She became lively, animated and frisky, anxious to jump and run. I remarked to Mary Ann, “What happened? This is certainly not the sad, lifeless, lethargic dog I thought we adopted.”

In fact, over the three plus years we have had her, Sadie has proved quite the opposite. She is by far the most animated of all the dogs we have ever owned — always actively engaged; whether digging in the backyard, demanding at least one walk a day or just wanting to be petted or played with.

She is, moreover, a quintessential “chowhound” constantly craving food — not just her daily allotment of dog food, but also sneaking unattended morsels in the kitchen or scrounging scraps dropped by others while on walks or running free. Sadie is, indeed, a far cry from the pathetic pooch that we first encountered at the SPCA on that fateful day over three years ago much to our relief and, alas, at times, consternation.

 

Newell G. Bringhurst is a retired College of the Sequoias history instructor and author of several books on the history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

 

 

 

 

7 thoughts on ““But if We Don’t Adopt Her, No One Else Will!””

  1. HAPPY DANCE FOR ALL! 😀 SADIE IS SUCH A BEAUTIFUL GIRL! SHE HAS THE OLD SOUL LOOK +ALMOST A HUMAN LOOK UPON HER.YOU CAN [email protected] HER & SEE SHE’S ONE HAPPY GIRL! 🙂 I KNOW SADIE THANKS YOU FOR SAVING HER LIFE& GIVING HER LAST YRS. THE BEST THEY COULD EVER BE & SO DO I! THANK YOU BOTH! IT DOES MY ♥ GOOD TO KNOW THRER ARE STILL SOME WHOM WALK AMONG US SUCH AS YOURSELVES.YOU HAVE A VERY SPECIAL WIFE, LADY, THERE , SHARING YOUR LIFE W/YOU KIND SIR &SHE HAS A WONDERFUL HUSBAND, MAN, WHOM SHE ALSO SHARES HER LIFE WITH.YOU DON’T FIND MANY WHOM ARE WILLING TO DO AS HE HAS DONE. I WISH THE TWO OF YOU MANY WONDERFUL YEARS &TO CONTINUED TO HELP THE DOGS WHOM ARE IN NEED. IF YOU HAVE CHILDREN I HOPE YOU HAVE BEEN ABLED TO RAISE THEM W/ THE SAME COMPASSION FOR ANIMALS &HOW TO TREAT EACH OTHER (HUSBAND & WIFE) AS
    APPARENTLY AS THE TWO OF YOU MUST HAVE. I TAKE THIS INSIGHT FROM THE LITTLE INFO YOU
    HAVE GIVEN IN DETAIL OF YOUR STORY BUT MOSTLY FROM WHAT I SEE IN SADIES FACE. I WISH I COULD MEET HER & REALLY GET TO KNOW HER…THINK OF ALL SHE COULD TELL! 😉 PEACE &LOVE BE W/YOU &THOSE OF YOURS.-JACKI JOHNSON

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  2. My Sadie was the same way. She was born into a puppy mill and she was abused by her previous owner. She was so starved and dehydrated that she seemed really calm and sweet. Once we got her home she became a different dog. It took us three years of patience to get her to feel safe and happy. Now she is one sweet obedient dog who is very loveable. I’m so glad we adopted her and took the time to show her a new life. It’s a really rewarding experience.

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  3. My feeling is the same about older pets. Seems shelters would rather put down an older pet figuring nobody wants them

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  4. Makes me smile! God love u both & Sadie too. She had a happy life in her last years & knew she was loved.

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  5. Most dogs don’t do well in shelters that is why she was so sad before. Once she knew she was safe and loved she transformed into a normal happy dog.

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  6. All a dog really needs is a little love (and a lot of food as they will tell you). A dog can go from a pathetic looking sad fuzz ball to a perfect little bundle of happiness.

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  7. Our beagle mix Lucy came from the McKinney, Tx. SPCA. They estimated her age at 3 years. It took her about 2 weeks to acclimate, liven up, and play with toys. Now she is approximately 11. I think shelters should tell adopters to give it time.

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