Student-Run Business Bringing Joy of Puppies to Those Who Can’t Own

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5.27.14 - Student-Run Business Bringing Joy of Puppies to Those that Can’t Own1

 

In August of 2012, the summer before Jenna Miller’s senior year at BYU, she started a student-run business called Puppies For Rent.  Miller was hoping to find a way that students whose apartment regulations make it impossible to have a furry friend, could spend some time with one on an hourly basis, and bring the joy that comes along with owning a puppy to them.

The Puppies For Rent idea has become so popular that they have seen it start up in a second and third location.  One has just opened in Logan, Utah which is home to the Utah State University.  The other one opens this May in Salt Lake City, and will work with students in the University of Utah community.

“I highly recommend that everyone who loves dogs at least rent once,” said student Megan Brunelle, who fell in love with and adopted a puppy named Duncan.  “It will brighten your day and bring joy to a puppy. What more could anyone ask for?”

Business has been booming over the past five months.  Puppy appointments need to be booked three days in advance at this point.  Current manager Lane Lawrence, a Utah Valley University student, has taken over now that Miller has graduated.  The outfit has a dozen student employees on payroll, and they typically have around six puppies per branch at a time.

The way it works is this; you select your puppy of choice, and it costs $15 for one hour, $25 for two and another $10 for each hour after that.  The ultimate goal for Puppies For Rent being to eventually find a loving forever home for each puppy in it’s charge.  So far, they boast a 100% success rate.  Lawrence says that 90 to 95 percent of dogs adopted out are received by people who have gone through the rental service.  The rest of the families adopting did not.

“The even better thing is when I get an email from someone saying they fell in love with a puppy and they’ll do anything to adopt it,” Lawrence said. “That means getting the puppy a home where it will be taken care of and loved for the rest of its life.”

Lawrence says yes, the money he makes working for the service helps pay his bills.  However, what’s most rewarding is seeing customers’ faces light up when he comes by with their puppy.

The best thing about this entire company is that these puppies are not coming from mills:  they are all from accidental pregnancies and families who could not keep their puppies.  Instead of ending up at a shelter, the puppies are being fostered (with many eventually adopted) and socialized at the crucial time when they need the most interactions to learn how to behave properly.

“People are often concerned that the puppies aren’t getting treated well during their rentals,” Lawrence said. “But after going on two years of being in business, we haven’t had a single incident of a puppy that has been harmed, and that’s something we are proud of.”

 

5.27.14 - Student-Run Business Bringing Joy of Puppies to Those that Can’t Own2

5 thoughts on “Student-Run Business Bringing Joy of Puppies to Those Who Can’t Own”

  1. Do they take the puppies to their houses or do they go to the place of business and play with them under supervision ? I would not let the puppies out of my site. I guess I am a bit paranoid because I read so many horror stories on the internet

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  2. Accidental puppies is just irresponsible pet owners being rewarded it seems. I hope they advocate having the pets altered. Or will this turn out to be just another way for backyard breeders to get rid of their puppies with a feel good story?

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  3. Where are the puppies being obtained? I see no point in supporting such a business if the pups themselves had come from backyard breeders who couldnt sell/were giving away for free, or even brokers. Are those in charge of adopting the pups out making sure they go to appropriate owners/homes? (for example, I wouldnt feel comfortable adopting a German Shepherd pup to an owner who is is not active and whom hasnt got dog ownership experience).
    Do the pups get any prior vet work done before adoption? when I adopted my dog she came to me; vaccinated,spayed, wormed, on preventions (flea,worm,heart worm),microchipped, and groomed/clipped (as she is a shihtzu/maltese mix).

    I think the idea in itself is good, I just worry about where the pups are coming from, what they have had done (vet work wise), and who the pups are going to.

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    • Looks like SOMEONE didn’t read through it thoroughly.

      “The best thing about this entire company is that these puppies are not coming from mills: they are all from accidental pregnancies and families who could not keep their puppies. Instead of ending up at a shelter, the puppies are being fostered (with many eventually adopted) and socialized at the crucial time when they need the most interactions to learn how to behave properly.”

      Apart from THAT(WaryBear) I agree with a lot of what you mentioned. especially when it comes to making sure the puppies are going to appropriate homes and owners.

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  4. I did read it, and it seems like incentive for back yard breeders to get rid of their pups. Why spay and neuter if you have a market? It wasn’t mentioned, but how much do they pay per pup? This could work, but I think the terminology, accidental puppies, is a smoke screen for back yard breeders or small volume mills.

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